Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C.’s culinary scene is exploding. As a result, top-notch restaurants in Washington, D.C. are popping up everywhere, with kitchens dishing up fare inspired by cultures around the world. Here, a few of the best restaurants in Washington, D.C. to whet your appetite.
In the Atlas District, Granville Moore’s serves hearty bison burgers and Belgian beer. The eatery’s Belgian fries have won them a loyal following among locals, and so has their happy hour, which goes from 10 p.m. until the wee hours.
At the Spy City Café, located next to the International Spy Museum, you can check out old covert mission maps while eating a cheeseburger. Order the Pigs Undercover while sipping Moxie, the world’s oldest cola brand. Also next to the museum, Zola restaurant’s “secret” door leads diners to the restrooms.
For a late meal after the theater—Warner’s Theater is steps away—Equinox has a constantly changing menu featuring mid-Atlantic specialties such as oysters wrapped in Virginia ham. It’s one of best Washington, D.C. restaurants.
Many restaurants in Washington, D.C. serve Latin American food, but Ceiba is the one to visit. Walls are hung with folk art and the Cuban black bean soup is delicious.

A local chain with eateries in D.C., Virginia, and Maryland, this deli channels the City of Brotherly Love with its hoagies and sandwiches—all its sandwiches are named after streets in Philadelphia.

Adjacent to the lobby of the International Spy Museum, this casual café is ideal for a quick bite before or after touring the exhibits.

A West End favorite, Blue Duck Tavern serves home-style American fare with an emphasis on traditional methods of cooking like roasting, braising, preserving, and smoking.

The more casual sister restaurant to Marcel’s, this traditional Belgian brasserie opened in the McPherson Square neighborhood in 2007.

Dukem, a casual eatery in the U Street Corridor, is widely acclaimed as one of the best traditional Ethiopian restaurants in the nation. The dining room is adorned with simple wooden tables, large windows, and an illuminated marble bar with miniature columns.

Straight out of southern Louisiana, Acadiana serves up Cajun and Creole fusion and Southern-style cocktails in an expansive glassed-in space designed to mimic a grand New Orleans dining hall.

Thomas Keller protégé Eric Ziebold turns out accessible haute cuisine in this restaurant’s gleaming open kitchen—and largely succeeds in living up to the hype his arrival created in early 2004.

For Belgian beer and gastropub grub, Granville Moore's has become a staple in the H Street NE neighborhood (also known as the Atlas District)What. The dark and narrow dining room creates a snug ambiance in this retrofitted two-level terrace house.

At his restaurant Central, chef Michel Richard creates traditional American fare with a French flair.

Ideal for pre-theatre dining, this small, intimate Italian restaurant is located in the Foggy Bottom district, just a seven-minute walk from the Kennedy Center.

A local institution, the Moby Dick House of Kabob was founded by an Iranian restauranteur in 1989 but has now expanded to 15 locations throughout the metro area.

Chef Vikram Sunderam, a Bombay native, came to The District after working in one of London’s most acclaimed Indian restaurants, Bombay Brasserie. At Rasika, Sunderam brings his own modern take on traditional Indian cuisine.