Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C.’s culinary scene is exploding. As a result, top-notch restaurants in Washington, D.C. are popping up everywhere, with kitchens dishing up fare inspired by cultures around the world. Here, a few of the best restaurants in Washington, D.C. to whet your appetite.
In the Atlas District, Granville Moore’s serves hearty bison burgers and Belgian beer. The eatery’s Belgian fries have won them a loyal following among locals, and so has their happy hour, which goes from 10 p.m. until the wee hours.
At the Spy City Café, located next to the International Spy Museum, you can check out old covert mission maps while eating a cheeseburger. Order the Pigs Undercover while sipping Moxie, the world’s oldest cola brand. Also next to the museum, Zola restaurant’s “secret” door leads diners to the restrooms.
For a late meal after the theater—Warner’s Theater is steps away—Equinox has a constantly changing menu featuring mid-Atlantic specialties such as oysters wrapped in Virginia ham. It’s one of best Washington, D.C. restaurants.
Many restaurants in Washington, D.C. serve Latin American food, but Ceiba is the one to visit. Walls are hung with folk art and the Cuban black bean soup is delicious.

Offering French-inspired American cuisine minus the fine-dining prices, this DC eatery by Chef Michel Richard won the 2008 James Beard award for best new restaurant.

Located in Capitol Hill’s Eastern Market, Market Lunch is famous for its Blue Buck pancakes, a combination of blueberry and buckwheat that is only available on Saturday mornings and attracts sizable crowds.

A neighborhood 24/7 eatery, the Diner is located in Adams Morgan. The restaurant is relaxed and no-frills; simple tables are accompanied by bar stools that recall the ones found in soda shops of years gone by.

The Burger: Given the New Austerity sweeping the capital, lobbyists are loving the street cred they garner by trading prime rib for America’s favorite combo meal.

Owned by celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck, the Source is an acclaimed pan-Asian restaurant located inside the Newseum. The restaurant is divided into two sections: a formal upstairs dining room and a casual downstairs lounge inspired by traditional Japanese izakayas (after-work drinkin

Opened in Logan Circle in 2001, this small restaurant quickly earned a loyal following with its authentic and affordable Thai cuisine.

Located in the Adams Morgan neighborhood, this authentic Ethiopian eatery is named after the calendar month that marks the end of a long rainy season in Ethiopia. Accordingly, the ceiling of the three-level dining room is painted with a bright yellow sunburst.

Green to the extreme, this 21st-century approximation of a farmhouse just blocks from the White House features menus printed on recycled paper and award-winning CORE architecture.

Located in the Shaw neighborhood, this unique eatery is named after Marvin Gaye and is inspired by the time he spent in the Belgian town of Ostend.

A local chain with eateries in D.C., Virginia, and Maryland, this deli channels the City of Brotherly Love with its hoagies and sandwiches—all its sandwiches are named after streets in Philadelphia.

A West End favorite, Blue Duck Tavern serves home-style American fare with an emphasis on traditional methods of cooking like roasting, braising, preserving, and smoking.

The more casual sister restaurant to Marcel’s, this traditional Belgian brasserie opened in the McPherson Square neighborhood in 2007.

Adjacent to the lobby of the International Spy Museum, this casual café is ideal for a quick bite before or after touring the exhibits.