Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Though hard to find this second-floor, Dupont-Circle treat, the delectable sushi is a treasure worth the hunt. The lively space is packed with neighborhood regulars who greet the chefs behind the sushi bar. Seats at the bar are hard to come by so be prepared to sit on silk floor pillows.

An offshoot of the popular District franchise, Cakelove, Love Café is a casual gathering spot serving coffee, sweets, and light meals. The café, like its sister shop, was founded by Warren Brown, a lawyer-turned-baker.

This popular Penn Quarter eatery by Chef Peter Smith occupies a boxy, earth-toned space designed by GrizForm Design Architects.

Offering French-inspired American cuisine minus the fine-dining prices, this DC eatery by Chef Michel Richard won the 2008 James Beard award for best new restaurant.

Located in Dupont Circle, Komi is a unique dining experience without menus. Instead, diners get a multi-course diner, ranging from 18 to 22 courses, for $135 per person.

Since it opened in 2005, Hank’s Oyster Bar has been a favorite in Dupont Circle. Inside, exposed brick walls are complimented by light wood tables, exposed duct work, pendant lighting, and a lofted ceiling.

Billed as the first sushi bar in Washington, D.C., this tiny Glover Park hole-in-the-wall makes up for its lack of ambiance with a menu of fresh, skillfully prepared seafood.

Appropriately, this Penn Quarter restaurant, located right next door to the Spy Museum, feels straight out of James Bond. Champagne-filled ice buckets punctuate a series of dining rooms set against a dramatic backdrop of mirrored walls and floor-to-ceiling windows.

Close enough to the Capitol to qualify as a third house of Congress, the streamlined, modern halls of this temple to red meat resonate daily with the sound of murmured deals, secrets, and tomorrow's front-page news.

Located in Capitol Hill’s Eastern Market, Market Lunch is famous for its Blue Buck pancakes, a combination of blueberry and buckwheat that is only available on Saturday mornings and attracts sizable crowds.

A neighborhood 24/7 eatery, the Diner is located in Adams Morgan. The restaurant is relaxed and no-frills; simple tables are accompanied by bar stools that recall the ones found in soda shops of years gone by.

The Burger: Given the New Austerity sweeping the capital, lobbyists are loving the street cred they garner by trading prime rib for America’s favorite combo meal.

The creation of former White House chef Frank Ruta, Palena showcases his own interpretation of American cuisine with an Italian- and French-influenced menu.