Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C.’s culinary scene is exploding. As a result, top-notch restaurants in Washington, D.C. are popping up everywhere, with kitchens dishing up fare inspired by cultures around the world. Here, a few of the best restaurants in Washington, D.C. to whet your appetite.
In the Atlas District, Granville Moore’s serves hearty bison burgers and Belgian beer. The eatery’s Belgian fries have won them a loyal following among locals, and so has their happy hour, which goes from 10 p.m. until the wee hours.
At the Spy City Café, located next to the International Spy Museum, you can check out old covert mission maps while eating a cheeseburger. Order the Pigs Undercover while sipping Moxie, the world’s oldest cola brand. Also next to the museum, Zola restaurant’s “secret” door leads diners to the restrooms.
For a late meal after the theater—Warner’s Theater is steps away—Equinox has a constantly changing menu featuring mid-Atlantic specialties such as oysters wrapped in Virginia ham. It’s one of best Washington, D.C. restaurants.
Many restaurants in Washington, D.C. serve Latin American food, but Ceiba is the one to visit. Walls are hung with folk art and the Cuban black bean soup is delicious.

Equinox is located just off of Lafayette Park, and is a scant block from the White House and Warner's Theater.

Like Washington itself, Vidalia serves up sophisticated city flavors colored by a slight but unmistakable Southern accent.

Founded in 1991, Pizzeria Paradiso serves what many consider the best pizza in the city.

The newest branch of chef Michel Richard’s growing mini-empire (there are two other Citronelles opening in California this year) is an extra-swanky temple of nouvelle French cuisine.

Named after explorer and navigator Henry Hudson, Hudson Restaurant & Lounge serves contemporary comfort food in a relaxed, come-as-you-are atmosphere.

This popular Penn Quarter eatery by Chef Peter Smith occupies a boxy, earth-toned space designed by GrizForm Design Architects.

Though hard to find this second-floor, Dupont-Circle treat, the delectable sushi is a treasure worth the hunt. The lively space is packed with neighborhood regulars who greet the chefs behind the sushi bar. Seats at the bar are hard to come by so be prepared to sit on silk floor pillows.

An offshoot of the popular District franchise, Cakelove, Love Café is a casual gathering spot serving coffee, sweets, and light meals. The café, like its sister shop, was founded by Warren Brown, a lawyer-turned-baker.

Located in Dupont Circle, Komi is a unique dining experience without menus. Instead, diners get a multi-course diner, ranging from 18 to 22 courses, for $135 per person.

Offering French-inspired American cuisine minus the fine-dining prices, this DC eatery by Chef Michel Richard won the 2008 James Beard award for best new restaurant.

Since it opened in 2005, Hank’s Oyster Bar has been a favorite in Dupont Circle. Inside, exposed brick walls are complimented by light wood tables, exposed duct work, pendant lighting, and a lofted ceiling.

Billed as the first sushi bar in Washington, D.C., this tiny Glover Park hole-in-the-wall makes up for its lack of ambiance with a menu of fresh, skillfully prepared seafood.

Appropriately, this Penn Quarter restaurant, located right next door to the Spy Museum, feels straight out of James Bond. Champagne-filled ice buckets punctuate a series of dining rooms set against a dramatic backdrop of mirrored walls and floor-to-ceiling windows.