Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C.’s culinary scene is exploding. As a result, top-notch restaurants in Washington, D.C. are popping up everywhere, with kitchens dishing up fare inspired by cultures around the world. Here, a few of the best restaurants in Washington, D.C. to whet your appetite.
In the Atlas District, Granville Moore’s serves hearty bison burgers and Belgian beer. The eatery’s Belgian fries have won them a loyal following among locals, and so has their happy hour, which goes from 10 p.m. until the wee hours.
At the Spy City Café, located next to the International Spy Museum, you can check out old covert mission maps while eating a cheeseburger. Order the Pigs Undercover while sipping Moxie, the world’s oldest cola brand. Also next to the museum, Zola restaurant’s “secret” door leads diners to the restrooms.
For a late meal after the theater—Warner’s Theater is steps away—Equinox has a constantly changing menu featuring mid-Atlantic specialties such as oysters wrapped in Virginia ham. It’s one of best Washington, D.C. restaurants.
Many restaurants in Washington, D.C. serve Latin American food, but Ceiba is the one to visit. Walls are hung with folk art and the Cuban black bean soup is delicious.

Billed as the first sushi bar in Washington, D.C., this tiny Glover Park hole-in-the-wall makes up for its lack of ambiance with a menu of fresh, skillfully prepared seafood.

Close enough to the Capitol to qualify as a third house of Congress, the streamlined, modern halls of this temple to red meat resonate daily with the sound of murmured deals, secrets, and tomorrow's front-page news.

Located in Capitol Hill’s Eastern Market, Market Lunch is famous for its Blue Buck pancakes, a combination of blueberry and buckwheat that is only available on Saturday mornings and attracts sizable crowds.

A neighborhood 24/7 eatery, the Diner is located in Adams Morgan. The restaurant is relaxed and no-frills; simple tables are accompanied by bar stools that recall the ones found in soda shops of years gone by.

The Burger: Given the New Austerity sweeping the capital, lobbyists are loving the street cred they garner by trading prime rib for America’s favorite combo meal.

The creation of former White House chef Frank Ruta, Palena showcases his own interpretation of American cuisine with an Italian- and French-influenced menu.

This intimate neighborhood restaurant prides itself on being environmentally conscious: The tables are made from salvaged barn wood, the glassware from recycled wine bottles, and a candle-lit live oak tree shoots up through the middle of the restaurant's interior.

As much a cultural experience as a place for a meal, this restaurant and sushi bar on MacArthur Blvd takes traditional Japanese dining seriously. Dinner at Makoto is a formal affair in an environment where rules of decorum are observed and hushed tones seem appropriate.

Pasta Mia, in the Adams Morgan neighborhood, has the appearance of an unassuming local Italian restaurant with a small glass and brick exterior. But even though it doesn’t open until 6:30 p.m., patrons tend to line up outside about 45 minutes before service begins—plus, there are only 40 seats.

Owned by celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck, the Source is an acclaimed pan-Asian restaurant located inside the Newseum. The restaurant is divided into two sections: a formal upstairs dining room and a casual downstairs lounge inspired by traditional Japanese izakayas (after-work drinkin

Opened in Logan Circle in 2001, this small restaurant quickly earned a loyal following with its authentic and affordable Thai cuisine.

Poste Moderne Brasserie is technically a part of the Hotel Monaco, but it's housed inside the 1841 General Post Office building. The restaurant has its own entrance accessed through a carriageway and a courtyard.