Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

The gelato and sorbet parlor touts all-natural, high-end ingredients and a broad selection of classic and fancy flavors, such as cardamom, black tea, banana, or white grapefruit. Mixing is allowed and encouraged.

Michel Richard, the French-born celebrity chef, brings meatballs to the people with his latest venture in DIY dining.

Every surface is covered in kitchen equipment and accoutrements both practical (tea kettles and mugs) and fanciful (cookie cutters shaped like 49 states, plus the District; sorry Hawaii).

The restaurant rocks out with fine (and sometimes exotic) meats, American craft beer (more than 20 on tap), and a punk roadhouse atmosphere. Every Wednesday, the chef adds a special wild game entrée (kangaroo, snake, ostrich, yak, etc.) to the already adventurous menu.

After the cooks fry the falafel, the patrons take over, topping their handheld sandwiches with any of the 20-plus sauces, salads, pickled items and Middle Eastern dips available at the fixings bar.

The French restaurant serves the best-of bistro cuisine: braised rabbit leg, calf liver, cassoulet, and hanger steak. Dine inside on Gallic country-style wooden tables or outdoors a la Paris cafe.

The National Museum of the American Indian’s Mitsitam Native Foods Café—translated as “Let’s Eat” in the language of the Delaware and Piscataway tribes—prepares traditional dishes from five Native American regions.

The American and sushi restaurant has a number of draws—the rooftop bar, for instance—but its most diva-esque attraction is Sunday drag brunch, now in its 19th year. The “girls” lip-synch and strut around the main dining area, adding extra sizzle to the all-you-can-eat buffet.

The cubicle-size restaurant serves authentic Mexican fare. And while menu items are written in Spanish—tamales de puerco y pollo, rojos y verdas, they are thoughtfully described in English (“pork or chicken tamales with red or green sauce”).

After pressuring their four (now five) sons to either attend college or create a business, Jerry and Janie Murrell banded together with their family and opened the first Five Guys Burgers and Fries in Virginia in 1986.

Up until very recently, the only VIP deemed worthy of a free meal at the Ali family chili shrine was longtime devotee Bill Cosby, who made the venue a national destination when he held a press conference there in the 1980s.