Washington, D.C.

Restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C.’s culinary scene is exploding. As a result, top-notch restaurants in Washington, D.C. are popping up everywhere, with kitchens dishing up fare inspired by cultures around the world. Here, a few of the best restaurants in Washington, D.C. to whet your appetite.
In the Atlas District, Granville Moore’s serves hearty bison burgers and Belgian beer. The eatery’s Belgian fries have won them a loyal following among locals, and so has their happy hour, which goes from 10 p.m. until the wee hours.
At the Spy City Café, located next to the International Spy Museum, you can check out old covert mission maps while eating a cheeseburger. Order the Pigs Undercover while sipping Moxie, the world’s oldest cola brand. Also next to the museum, Zola restaurant’s “secret” door leads diners to the restrooms.
For a late meal after the theater—Warner’s Theater is steps away—Equinox has a constantly changing menu featuring mid-Atlantic specialties such as oysters wrapped in Virginia ham. It’s one of best Washington, D.C. restaurants.
Many restaurants in Washington, D.C. serve Latin American food, but Ceiba is the one to visit. Walls are hung with folk art and the Cuban black bean soup is delicious.

The National Museum of the American Indian’s Mitsitam Native Foods Café—translated as “Let’s Eat” in the language of the Delaware and Piscataway tribes—prepares traditional dishes from five Native American regions.

Michel Richard, the French-born celebrity chef, brings meatballs to the people with his latest venture in DIY dining.

After the cooks fry the falafel, the patrons take over, topping their handheld sandwiches with any of the 20-plus sauces, salads, pickled items and Middle Eastern dips available at the fixings bar.

The American and sushi restaurant has a number of draws—the rooftop bar, for instance—but its most diva-esque attraction is Sunday drag brunch, now in its 19th year. The “girls” lip-synch and strut around the main dining area, adding extra sizzle to the all-you-can-eat buffet.

Every surface is covered in kitchen equipment and accoutrements both practical (tea kettles and mugs) and fanciful (cookie cutters shaped like 49 states, plus the District; sorry Hawaii).

The French restaurant serves the best-of bistro cuisine: braised rabbit leg, calf liver, cassoulet, and hanger steak. Dine inside on Gallic country-style wooden tables or outdoors a la Paris cafe.

The cubicle-size restaurant serves authentic Mexican fare. And while menu items are written in Spanish—tamales de puerco y pollo, rojos y verdas, they are thoughtfully described in English (“pork or chicken tamales with red or green sauce”).

The gelato and sorbet parlor touts all-natural, high-end ingredients and a broad selection of classic and fancy flavors, such as cardamom, black tea, banana, or white grapefruit. Mixing is allowed and encouraged.

The restaurant rocks out with fine (and sometimes exotic) meats, American craft beer (more than 20 on tap), and a punk roadhouse atmosphere. Every Wednesday, the chef adds a special wild game entrée (kangaroo, snake, ostrich, yak, etc.) to the already adventurous menu.

Poste Moderne Brasserie is technically a part of the Hotel Monaco, but it's housed inside the 1841 General Post Office building. The restaurant has its own entrance accessed through a carriageway and a courtyard.

Housed inside D.C.’s Colorado Building, an historic Beaux Arts office building just a block from the White House, Ceiba’s menu celebrates chef Jeff Tunks’ travels through the Yucatan, Brazil, Peru, and Cuba.