Washington, D.C.

Hotels in Washington, D.C.

You’ll find one of the country’s best cultural scenes in Washington, D.C. In recent years, the our nation’s capital has also undergone a serious restaurant and nightlife renaissance. To craft your perfect itinerary in our up-and-coming capital, turn to this Washington D.C. travel guide.

Things Not to Miss in Washington, D.C.
Travel to Washington, D.C. is a unique experience. Its most notable neighborhoods include Georgetown, Adams Morgan, Downtown, and DuPont Circle. Here’s what to do there and beyond:

• The White House
• Cherry trees (springtime only)
• Washington Monument
• Lincoln Memorial
• Vietnam Veterans Memorial
• John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
• 17 Smithsonian museums; don’t miss the National Air and Space Museum

When to Visit Washington, D.C.

• Washington, D.C. travel in the spring is the best time to go—the weather is beautiful and the cherry trees are in bloom.
• During the hot summer months, many of the nation’s leaders head out of town, while travelers from all over the world flock to the city’s monuments.
• That means the city is lively, but July and August can be crowded and buggy.
• The holiday season is a lively time to visit Washington, D.C. For many, the White House Christmas tree is a sight to behold, historic theaters stage classic Christmas performances, and carolers make their way down the avenues.

The all-suites hotel on a quiet street touts such special touches as full-size kitchens, coffee grinders and Potomac River views.

This 133-room boutique hotel is in the middle of M Street action but set slightly back, insulating guests from the loud street clatter. The property has two standout features: a rooftop pool and, off the lobby, the acclaimed Citronelle restaurant, run by celeb chef Michel Richard.

Tucked in a trio of Victorian row houses on a residential street, the European-style bed-and-breakfast provides a tranquil sanctuary steps from the action on 18th Street.

The 149-room hotel brings the luck and love of the Irish to Capitol Hill. The property is owned by an Irishman and shares the name of the famous park in Dublin. Waterford crystal sparkles in a display behind the front desk.

Pop culture rules at this fame-obsessed Art Deco hotel with a red-carpet entrance. At home in trendy Logan Circle, this colorful Kimpton property has an over-the-top glam '60s style.

The W Washington, D.C. Hotel is the place to see the nation's capital: The Point of View Terrace provides notable views of the Washington Monument, White House, Pentagon, and Potomac River.

As unlike its regal sister hotel downtown as it's possible to be, this converted 19th-century incinerator in the heart of Georgetown is low-key, modern, and above all, private; there's even a hidden VIP entrance for visiting celebs and politicos.

This funky boutique hotel three blocks from Dupont Circle is serious about the color red.

The Hilton Washington is just a stone's throw away from Dupont Circle and is convenient to a number of Washington, D.C. area attractions, including Georgetown and the Smithsonian National Zoo.

One of the city's finest hotels, this rebuilt 19th-century residence also boasts what is arguably the city's best location: directly across Lafayette Park from the White House, with knockout views of the famous mansion from the sixth, seventh, and eighth floors.

Occupying a 1960's-era building by the designer of Miami's Fountainbleu Hotel, this boutique hotel combines a retro-curvy exterior with updated common areas: Frank Gehry and Philippe Starck were among the designers contributing to the lobby's modern style, with brightly colored furniture, damask

A member of the Historic Hotels of America, the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel opened in 1925 and has a noted past hosting inaugural balls for every president from Coolidge through Reagan.

This 200-year-old hotel remains steeped in Washington history, even though the rooms where Lincoln lived, Coolidge governed, and Martin Luther King Jr. wrote have long since been renovated away.

You could be forgiven for misidentifying this Mandarin outpost, opened in 2004 and gorgeously set on the Tidal Basin, as some sort of Pan-Asian embassy. The Far East sensibility is all-encompassing, with the effect of breathing freshness and calm into D.C.'s traditional, harried landscape.

The sleek 139-room Washington, D.C., hotel is all about clean architectural materials such as limestone and dark teakwood paired with unexpected dashes of olive green and deep purple.