Washington D.C. Suburbs

Restaurants in Washington D.C. Suburbs

A classic neighborhood diner.

A modern oyster bar and fish house located on Woodmont Avenue in Bethesda, Black’s Bar & Kitchen serves organic and coastal selections. More than 300 varieties of wine are housed on racks inside a floor-to-ceiling glass room visible to guests.

About 15 minutes from D.C., this small Cantonese restaurant is renowned for its lunchtime dim sum, as well as the house specialty: roasted Peking duck, served in a scallion pancake with homemade plum sauce.

The 2010-opened resto may serve pillowy beignets and slow-cooked jambalaya, but its soul-satisfying offerings (braised-pork-shoulder sausage infused with cayenne, anyone?) plumb the depths of Louisiana’s complex cuisine.

Owned by chef Cathal Armstrong and his wife Meshelle, Restaurant Eve—named after the couple’s daughter—is located inside a restored 19th-century warehouse.

Located at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains just an hour west of D.C., the 1829 Ashby Inn is home to an acclaimed New American restaurant serving lunch, dinner, and Sunday brunch.

Restaurateur Michael Landrum already had a fanatical following at his unpretentious steak house, Ray’s the Steaks. The response has been just as enthusiastic for his new burger joint in an Arlington strip mall.

As the name implies, the specialty here is pho, the traditional Vietnamese soup with meat and rice noodles. This hole-in-the-wall restaurant serves over 20 variations of the classic soup, and Thai basil, bean sprouts, and lime can be added for extra flavor.

Inspired by his time spent in southern Provence, chef John-Gustin Birkitt opened this authentic French bistro in a white, Federal-style building near downtown Middleburg.

Tastes great, extra filling? Beer inspires ice cream makers all over the world, it seems, from random beer gardens in Europe to craft-beer establishments in the U.S. It also tends to be seasonal.

Part café and part gourmet food shop, Market Salamander is a collaboration between owner Sheila Johnson and D.C. chef Todd Gray.

The view of Washington, D.C.’s landmarks across the Potomac is part of Indigo Landing’s appeal.