Virginia Travel Guide

Slumber in good conscience at the certified-green B&B, tucked in the hills near Floyd. The homey farmhouse has views of the garden and the rolling landscape beyond.

Park and walk this 1.8-mile round trip path, a wildlife-rich hike with educational signs along the way.

The red-roofed log-cabin store sits on the crest of a steep hill. Its porch (in the Fall) is strewn with pumpkins and features a cider press. Elsewhere on the property apple butter boils in a copper kettle hung over a wood fire.

The winery makes a jammy Petit Verdot.

The Tarara Winery opened in 1989 and was founded by Whitie and Margaret Hubert. The winery sits on a 475-acre farm and is dedicated to promoting local Virginia vineyards. A tasting room is open daily, and wines can be sampled alongside cheese, charcuterie, or chocolate.

A horseracing tradition for almost a century, this annual steeplechase event takes place during the third weekend in April at the Glenwood Park Racecourse.

Chrysalis Vineyards, located outside Washington, D.C. near Middleburg, Va., encompasses 71 acres on which 20 grape varieties are grown. Production focuses on the Norton, a grape native to Virginia, as well as an assortment of Spanish and French varietals.

The music scene was fertile here B.D.M.B.—that is, before the Dave Matthews Band, which formed in Charlottesville in the early 1990s. These days, alternative rock, country, and reggae acts—as well as, of course, jam bands—get crowds moving at the Charlottesville Pavilion.

Luxuriate in the 98-degree waters of the hot spring–fueled Jefferson Pools, established in 1761.

Floyd might have a lunch counter, but it’s best known for its music: Friday nights at the Floyd Country Store, a “jamboree” of bluegrass starts at 6:30 and ends around 10:30. The performers are mostly up-and-comers from the surrounding hills.

Take a guided wildlife tour on a canopied boat to see the island’s famous wild ponies—and even dolphins and bald eagles.

Mount Vernon, built in 1757 on the Potomac River, served as the home of George Washington for more than four decades. A portion of the original estate has been preserved for public tours, which includes the mansion and the gravesites of George and Martha Washington.