Virginia

Virginia Travel Guide

There is never a shortage of things to do in Virginia. From tours of Presidential homes and battle sites, to shopping, spas and skiing: Virginia has it all. Visit colonial Williamsburg, and afterward head to Busch Gardens for great rides, animal shows and concerts.

For the horse lover there are so many things to do in Virginia. Visit Virginia in the fall to see the steeplechases races at Glenwood Park. Held in October, fans of horse racing will love visiting the oldest continually run racetrack in the country. Spectators can also watch a mock fox hunt being performed, as well as other races. During the month of October, visitors can also see the Gold Cup weekend races, which are held in Virginia’s horse country every weekend.

If you’re wondering what to do in Virginia visit the historic battlefield of Manassas. Reenactments are conducted annually at these sights, for times and schedules check the event calendars. The University of Virginia, in the gorgeous city of Charlottesville is a monument to learning designed and built by Thomas Jefferson. After visiting the university take a stroll around the beautiful grounds of Monticello, Jefferson’s historic home. Read this guide for a taste of what to do in Virginia.

Slumber in good conscience at the certified-green B&B, tucked in the hills near Floyd. The homey farmhouse has views of the garden and the rolling landscape beyond.

Park and walk this 1.8-mile round trip path, a wildlife-rich hike with educational signs along the way.

Sustainability guru Joel Salatin leads Intensive Discovery Seminars—where you’ll learn about raising poultry and eco-friendly farming.

Chrysalis Vineyards, located outside Washington, D.C. near Middleburg, Va., encompasses 71 acres on which 20 grape varieties are grown. Production focuses on the Norton, a grape native to Virginia, as well as an assortment of Spanish and French varietals.

The music scene was fertile here B.D.M.B.—that is, before the Dave Matthews Band, which formed in Charlottesville in the early 1990s. These days, alternative rock, country, and reggae acts—as well as, of course, jam bands—get crowds moving at the Charlottesville Pavilion.

Luxuriate in the 98-degree waters of the hot spring–fueled Jefferson Pools, established in 1761.

Floyd might have a lunch counter, but it’s best known for its music: Friday nights at the Floyd Country Store, a “jamboree” of bluegrass starts at 6:30 and ends around 10:30. The performers are mostly up-and-comers from the surrounding hills.

Take a guided wildlife tour on a canopied boat to see the island’s famous wild ponies—and even dolphins and bald eagles.

The Warehouse District shop sells flirty silk tops and Frye boots.

Mount Vernon, built in 1757 on the Potomac River, served as the home of George Washington for more than four decades. A portion of the original estate has been preserved for public tours, which includes the mansion and the gravesites of George and Martha Washington.

in 1770, Jefferson sold some of the land surrounding Monticello, his sprawling Palladian home up in the hills just outside Charlottesville, to an Italian grower whose experiments with hybrid American-European grapes were among the first such plantings this side of the Atlantic.