Virginia

Restaurants in Virginia

Housed in the old post office building, this family-friendly restaurant serves generous plates of comfort food, everything from cheese fries to lasagna and create-your-own sundaes. The real stars here are the sandwiches—some 20-plus varieties.

As the name implies, the specialty here is pho, the traditional Vietnamese soup with meat and rice noodles. This hole-in-the-wall restaurant serves over 20 variations of the classic soup, and Thai basil, bean sprouts, and lime can be added for extra flavor.

Owned by chef Cathal Armstrong and his wife Meshelle, Restaurant Eve—named after the couple’s daughter—is located inside a restored 19th-century warehouse.

Tastes great, extra filling? Beer inspires ice cream makers all over the world, it seems, from random beer gardens in Europe to craft-beer establishments in the U.S. It also tends to be seasonal.

About 15 minutes from D.C., this small Cantonese restaurant is renowned for its lunchtime dim sum, as well as the house specialty: roasted Peking duck, served in a scallion pancake with homemade plum sauce.

Amid the inner workings of a historic gristmill, the Waterwheel Restaurant offers stylish country dishes like Allegheny Mountain trout pan-fried with black walnuts.

The juicy pulled-pork platter draws ‘cue fans from across the state. Sides of sugary baked beans and heaps of crispy fries don’t hurt either.

Part café and part gourmet food shop, Market Salamander is a collaboration between owner Sheila Johnson and D.C. chef Todd Gray.

Dishes at wood-beam–ceilinged The Local showcase homegrown ingredients, as in Blue Ridge Mountain brook trout with Cajun rémoulade. Virginia gets its own section on the wine list.

Town House closed in February, 2012.

A modern oyster bar and fish house located on Woodmont Avenue in Bethesda, Black’s Bar & Kitchen serves organic and coastal selections. More than 300 varieties of wine are housed on racks inside a floor-to-ceiling glass room visible to guests.