Virginia

Restaurants in Virginia

Housed in the old post office building, this family-friendly restaurant serves generous plates of comfort food, everything from cheese fries to lasagna and create-your-own sundaes. The real stars here are the sandwiches—some 20-plus varieties.

In season, cozy up to the Victorian fireplace for grass-fed-beef meatloaf and pecan pie.

Classic dishes like rack of lamb (paired with local wines) are served in an intimate period dining room.

Located at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains just an hour west of D.C., the 1829 Ashby Inn is home to an acclaimed New American restaurant serving lunch, dinner, and Sunday brunch.

Sidewalk tables and a long, railroad-style dining room give this eatery a continental flair; book a table for two and lunch on artisanal cheeses and garlicky mussels.

The 2010-opened resto may serve pillowy beignets and slow-cooked jambalaya, but its soul-satisfying offerings (braised-pork-shoulder sausage infused with cayenne, anyone?) plumb the depths of Louisiana’s complex cuisine.

Virginia is one of the country’s fastest-growing wine regions, and Palladio is one of the best restaurants in the state—it’s built on the grounds of a now-ruined estate designed by Thomas Jefferson, and the food is as noteworthy as the wine.

The restaurant at the Inn at Little Washington, a 90-minute drive from Washington, D.C., and its chef, Patrick O'Connell, have received five James Beard Awards, including the 2001 Outstanding American Chef.

Restaurateur Michael Landrum already had a fanatical following at his unpretentious steak house, Ray’s the Steaks. The response has been just as enthusiastic for his new burger joint in an Arlington strip mall.

Head to this dining hall, housed in a restored 1700s cabin, for tender quail and grilled apples paired with Virginia wines and microbrews.

The revolutionary spirit prevails after 5, when 18th-century fare like Brunswick stew and Welsh rarebit are accompanied by colonial-style entertainment and family sing-alongs.