Virginia

Restaurants in Virginia

Housed in the old post office building, this family-friendly restaurant serves generous plates of comfort food, everything from cheese fries to lasagna and create-your-own sundaes. The real stars here are the sandwiches—some 20-plus varieties.

For the Beltway crowd ready to loosen their belts, this all-American comfort food hangout is where chef Liam LaCivita keeps two wood-fired ovens roaring hot.

The view of Washington, D.C.’s landmarks across the Potomac is part of Indigo Landing’s appeal.

Stop into the delightful wooden house on Sperryville’s Main Street for a Sunday brunch of mushroom crêpes or French toast.

Early birds get a deal, a candlelit boîte with reduced prices for prix fixe dinners of classic French cuisine before 7 p.m. But no matter when you book, you won’t forget top dishes such as the seared Chesapeake Bay rockfish.

As the name implies, the specialty here is pho, the traditional Vietnamese soup with meat and rice noodles. This hole-in-the-wall restaurant serves over 20 variations of the classic soup, and Thai basil, bean sprouts, and lime can be added for extra flavor.

Owned by chef Cathal Armstrong and his wife Meshelle, Restaurant Eve—named after the couple’s daughter—is located inside a restored 19th-century warehouse.

Tastes great, extra filling? Beer inspires ice cream makers all over the world, it seems, from random beer gardens in Europe to craft-beer establishments in the U.S. It also tends to be seasonal.

About 15 minutes from D.C., this small Cantonese restaurant is renowned for its lunchtime dim sum, as well as the house specialty: roasted Peking duck, served in a scallion pancake with homemade plum sauce.

Amid the inner workings of a historic gristmill, the Waterwheel Restaurant offers stylish country dishes like Allegheny Mountain trout pan-fried with black walnuts.