Vietnam

Vietnam Travel Guide

An Indian monk arrived during the third century in what is now the Ha Tay Province, and established the Dau Pagoda that has become one of Vietnam's oldest. An ancient place of worship with ornate wooden carvings, it was rebuilt during the 14th century.

Irony comes to Ho Chi Minh City at this perfectly named boutique that trades in Socialist-themed ephemera: Communist Party T-shirts, Uncle Ho coffee mugs, key-chains emblazoned with NVA tanks, and more.

Formerly known as the Exhibition House of American War Crimes (at least until the United States became Vietnam’s biggest trading partner), this haphazardly organized museum provides not so much a coherent narrative of Vietnam’s conflicts with the French and Americans as a visceral and often grues

At this minimalist shop tucked under the Beaux-Arts Municipal Theater, graphic primary-color classics are reminiscent of Michael Kors; a crimson satin party dress with an exposed zipper is a steal for less than $100.

Valerie Gregori McKenzie, a French clothing designer based in Saigon, sells her breezy resort wear (sundresses, tops, and sarongs in soft cotton, silk, and linen) and yoga separates at this pleasant and well-run boutique, which emphasizes ethical sourcing of fabrics.

The temple is topped by a colorful gopuram bedecked with Hindu gods and goddesses.

Located on a sacred site, this righteous park is meant to simulate Buddhist heaven.

Housed in a restored colonial villa (next door to a former opium refinery) with a broad terrace overlooking a tree-shrouded courtyard, this louche hot spot is a hangout for the local beau monde. It’s perpetually jammed, especially on weekend nights, when live bands or DJs reign.

Owner-tastemaker Catherine Denoual’s shop in the towering Saigon Centre mall, features delicately embroidered sateen bed linens in rich chocolates, golds, and caramels, as well as perhaps the world's most decadent silk charmeuse robe ($185), for your inner Marlene Dietrich.

Stepping into L’Usine is a whole other sensory experience: the light-filled industrial space (polished concrete floors; exposed beams) holds a café, a gallery, and a bevy of casual-cool clothing labels—even a selection of vintage bikes.

Whimsical, flamboyant handbags.

Every expat in town eventually winds up on Pacharan’s fourth-floor terrace (directly opposite the Park Hyatt hotel) for wine, sangria, and reliably good tapas on weekend nights.