Vienna

Things to do in Vienna

The complex includes the Architekturzentrum Wien; the Leopold Museum; the Museum Moderner Kunst; the Kunsthalle Wien; and more.

An essential stop in Vienna for any amateur (or professional) chef, Babette’s Spice & Books for Cooks Shop is part bookstore, part restaurant, and part cooking school.

Hajszan’s eponymous Heurige, a renovated grape-pressing house, has become one of the city’s hippest destinations.

Also known as the Kunsthistorisches Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts is the twin of the  Naturhistorisches Museum directly across Maria Theresien-Platz.

The Tanzschule Elmayer Dance School was established in 1919 by Willy Elmayer von Vestenbrugg, a former officer of the Austrian Imperial Army.

Stick to the northern end for farmer produce and fancy offerings, including Gegenbauer, with casks of homemade oils and vinegars, and Alles Seife’s handmade soap.

Named after one of Europe's oldest noble families, Palais Liechtenstein is home to a vast, private art collection that spans six centuries. The Princely Collections contains priceless sculptures, paintings, porcelain, and furniture and is considered to be one of the world's most significant.

The Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art focuses on the importance of design, and its holdings include furniture, china, and textiles dating from the Middle Ages to the present day.

Located on one of Vienna’s chicest streets, repurposes household and office items into furniture, including lamps made of used celluloid and a funky chaise longue created from old three-ring binders.

Many possessions of the Hapsburgs, as well as period rooms from two centuries of Austrian design.

Here, members of Vienna's aristocracy still choose the fabrics for their custom orders.

Otto Wagner's seminal 1906 architectural triumph is now a museum. Its glazed double-vaulted ceiling was a major innovation.

Numerous works by Klimt (including his masterpiece, The Kiss), Egon Schiele, and Oskar Kokoschka.

Stand in the middle of Michaelerplatz to admire Loos's 1910 Goldman & Salatsch Buiding, now a bank. The six-story green marble-clad structure was once considered so shockingly unadorned that window boxes were added to appease the neighbors.