Restaurants in Vienna

Perhaps one of the most famous restaurants in Vienna, Trzesniewski is often overrun with hungry locals and tourists fighting for space along the buffet line. The restaurant itself is small, and with only six or seven tables, seating is at a premium.

Crowds descend upon Gordon Bukovcan's cozy wine bar throughout the day. After all, the bar is on the lower level of renowned Julius Meinl gourmet supermarket, where many customers head downstairs (shoppping bags in tow) to enjoy a glass of wine.

Tucked in a courtyard behind busy Stephansplatz, Hollmann’s Salon serves exquisite portions of updated Viennese specials, including regional sheep and goat cheeses at long communal tables.

Though it’s welcomed plenty of tourists over its 137 years—not to mention habitués like Freud, Lenin, and Trotsky—the utterly grand café inside the majestic Palais Ferstel is known among pastry-obsessed Wieners for serving the best, flakiest strudel in town.

Marked by a larger-than-life milk bottle statue, this café is housed in a restored 1903 milk bar in the Wiener Stadtpark (Viennese City Park).

Vienna’s historic Innere Stadt district is home to Indochine 21, the hotspot for trendy diners to enjoy cocktails and French-Vietnamese fusion. Chef Wini Brugger brings to the table over a decade of training in Southeast Asia, having formerly resided in Vietnam.

A spot to linger over Viennese coffee and pastry or lunch.

Travelers hurrying through a visit to Zoo Vienna might easily miss the 1722 farmhouse that houses what is arguably the best restaurant in the zoo.

Serving Italian-inspired Austrian fare, this two-story restaurant is housed inside the 17th-century Palais Collalto, a Baroque palace where the six-year-old Mozart gave his first Viennese concert.

A family tradition since 1618, Zum Schwarzen Kameel is renowned for its traditional Austrian food. Owner Peter Friese has maintained the restaurant's formidable reputation since 1974, with modern flourishes such as exotic spices taking center stage.

Austria's first "pharmacy restaurant" opened in November 2006 under the moniker Saint Charles Alimentary.

The opening of Old Town's Café Korb, on the corner of Tuchlauben Strasse and Brandstätte, in 1904 was so noteworthy that Emperor Franz Josef attended.

Formerly a wine tavern and now a modern take on the traditional beisl, or pub, Gasthaus Wild serves traditional Viennese fare in a welcoming, neighborhood-like atmosphere. The interior is dominated by sturdy, dark wood tables and chairs, and yellow walls brighten the space.