Vermont

Restaurants in Vermont

A significant portion of Vermont's economy is tied into food. The state is the leading exporter of maple syrup and a major manufacturer of cheese—including the famous Cabot cheddar—and chocolate. Vermont is a beer lover's paradise, as well—there are more craft breweries opening up every day. And every town has a wonderful coffee shop, with freshly-roasted beans and fresh-baked goods.

Vermont restaurants offer a delicious selection drawn from the local cuisine. Hungry travelers can choose from bar settings to fine dining, all within easy distance of your accommodations (Vermont towns are very walkable). One thing all the best restaurants in Vermont have in common is the use of fresh, local ingredients.

No matter where you stay, Guild & Company is one Vermont restaurant that every visitor should try. This great steakhouse in Burlington gets all of its beef from the nearby farms. Afterward, if you have a sweet tooth, take a tour of the Ben and Jerry’s Factory, where you'll learn, among other things, how the company was started from a tiny gas station. Sample the flavor of the day and then head on over to the Scoop Shop to indulge in the many flavors that the ice cream giant is known for. It's not technically a restaurant in Vermont, but you won't want to pass it up!

Ensconced in a former grist mill built in 1835, Hen of the Wood’s modesty keeps it off the main tourist trek in nearby Stowe, but chef Eric Warnstedt wins continual praise for his uncomplicated, lightly seasoned menu with predominantly locally sourced dishes.

Previously featured on The Amazing Race, the 3 Dives jerk stand is named for the surrounding limestone cliffs, which provide great diving spots as well as stunning views of the sea.

Part of Jake's Hotel in Treasure Beach, Jack Sprat is a casual waterfront eatery with its own private beach on Calabash Bay.

Chow down on pub grub, including burgers and wood-grilled pizza, served amid ski memorabilia at extreme skier John Eagan’s restaurant.

Made almost entirely of driftwood, the thatched-roof Pelican Bar is set on stilts on a small sandbar about half a mile offshore in Parotee Bay. Part bar and part restaurant, the circular structure is accessible only by boat and is furnished with low wooden benches and windmill-powered lights.

Inside a classic white clapboard New England house with a wide, covered porch, the tiny, bright green, second-floor dining room of Pane e Salute seats around 20 snuggly at long, wooden farm tables or at poured concrete bar.

Pizza has always been the carb of choice for the Burton board set, and this groovy branch of a Sicilian family pizzeria chain earns black diamond status for its righteous pies. The young pie masters here can toss a round of dough as expertly as they carve runs on Mount Mansfield.

Located in Middle Quarters at the turnoff for YS Falls, Howie’s is a casual roadside eatery housed in a long, low-slung cinderblock building.

Hang with locals over hearty breakfasts and French bistro fare, including cassoulet, at dinnertime.

Popular with the locals, Alfred’s Ocean Palace is a casual restaurant, entertainment venue, and hotel situated on Negril’s famous Seven Mile Beach. The simple, concrete restaurant provides both dining room seating and outdoor tables, which are illuminated by candlelight after dark.

Of the four restaurants at the Woodstock Inn & Resort in southeastern Vermont, Red Rooster garners the most attention.  Its menu, which draws from the culinary heritage of the state, emphasizes fresh, local ingredients.

In a town known for chalets and wealthy tourists, McCarthy’s Restaurant in remains decidedly laid-back.