Venice Travel Guide

Legendary designer Mariano Fortuny assigned the colors for his fabrics’ poetic names: “Rembrandt rust straw and silvery gold,” “Bayou lime green and old ivory,” “seafoam green.” You’ll find these and more at this factory and shop, where 16,000 yards of Egyptian cotton are handcrafted every year.

To rent a costume for the February Carnevale, come here; The shop carries more than 10,000 period pieces.

The extraordinary Gothic structure houses Tintoretto's Paradiso—one of the largest paintings in the world—which hangs in the Sala del Maggiore Consiglio.


For the best view of the city young professionals and artsy types head here to sip glasses of Campari soda and Prosecco.

You’ll find boho-chic styles such as flared knee-length silk skirts in rouge and rust, and kimono jackets in red and fuchsia.

To teach travelers about the ecological challenges facing the city, the sustainable-tourism organization organizes guided walking tours, where you’ll learn about Venice’s preservation efforts.

Upcoming Italian housewares designers showcase a variety of modern pieces—like streamlined, blown-glass bottles—in this chic white-and-wood shop.

You'll feel like a Guggenheim as you take in the heiress's vast inventory of paintings and sculptures while wandering through her former palazzo on the Grand Canal. A recent expansion has given the works by Kandinsky, Pollock and Giacometti (among many others) room to breathe.

Serious collectors come for paintings and sculptures by top contemporary inter- national artists such as Toots Zynsky and Silvia Levenson.

Dried fruits, truffles, 80 kinds of spices, and 100 varieties of chocolate fill the shelves at the best grocery store in town.

The owners of the 62-year-old workshop create their unique handmade papers using a collection of 300 antique Asian printing blocks. The duo specializes in notebooks, wrapping paper, and photo frames.

This historic workshop is frequented both by Vatican priests and fashion designers. Take a guided tour to see how weavers create velvets on 18th- century looms.