Veneto

Veneto Travel Guide

Veneto is the romantic, Northeastern region of Italy that is home to fairytale cities like the Shakespearian towns of Verona and Padua, the mountain resorts of Cortina d'Ampezzo and Belluno and the floating city of Venice—the crown jewel of Italy. Although most people travel to Veneto to see Venice, there are many beautiful destinations across the countryside, from the beaches of Chioggia to the snowcapped Dolomite Mountains. Check out Travel + Leisure’s Veneto travel guide to find the best hotels, restaurants and sights.

Things Not to Miss in Veneto

• Take a boat to the island of Murano and watch the famous glassblowers at work
 • Shop in the charming mountain town of Asolo
 • Tour Palladio’s famous Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza
 • Swim in Lake Garda, Italy’s largest lake
 • Watch a life-size chess game in the medieval city of Marostica
 • Visit the Castelvecchio Museum in Verona

When to Go to Veneto

It is best to travel to Veneto from April to June or September to October. The temperatures in Italy are pleasantly mild while the crowds are not as large as other times of the year. If you enjoy the hustle and bustle of crowds, then you will want to go during the peak seasons between July and the middle of September. Most Italians take their own holiday during August, when the weather is hot and muggy, so you will find many shops or restaurants closed.

Articles about Veneto

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Venice: On the Campo San Zanipolo, look out for the rounded pediments that adorn the elegant 15th-century façade of Scuola Grande di San Marco, by Pietro Lombardo and Mauro Codussi. Marble reliefs of lions gaze out at the incomparable 1480’s eques...
The Veneto needs no introduction, or if it does, maybe you shouldn’t let on—is it possible you’re not as well-traveled as you think?I know too many people who’ve been to Venice a hundred times and never made good on vows to drag themselves out of ...
The Trip Stretching from the Dolomites to Lake Garda, the Veneto—known for its art, cuisine, and iconic cities such as Venice and Verona—is a microcosm of the best of Italy. Hotel Villa Cipriani, in the walled town of Asolo, makes an ideal base. ...
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1 Chef Claudio Pecorari is my new kitchen god. Standing in a doorway facing a flagstone courtyard, arms tucked under his tomato-smeared apron, he watches eleven novices clumsily rolling out ravioli and pronounces in his Venetian-inflected English:...