Vancouver

Things to do in Vancouver

It’s easy to fall in love with this Canadian city – there are just so many things to do in Vancouver. From exploring the metropolis’s ambitious, adventurous and hands-down delicious culinary scene, to partaking in a host of nearby outdoor activities (kayaking, hiking, skiing, you name it) visitors wondering what to do in Vancouver will be hard-pressed to run out of options.

Culture lovers will find a long list of things to do in Vancouver; the city boasts a lively art scene, and boutique galleries – which display work by local artists – dot the downtown and South Granville districts. Meanwhile, the Vancouver Art Gallery, located downtown, features a permanent collection of classical paintings from world-renowned artists, including British Columbia’s own Emily Carr. The nearby Contemporary Art Gallery displays more modern, cutting-edge art.

Visitors wondering what to do in Vancouver who get overwhelmed by the countless options should consider taking a tour – be it by bus, walking, hop-on, hop-off – to get oriented with the city and all the amazing activities, sights and delights it has to offer.

In the Victorian neighborhood of Gastown, this three-story Native American art gallery showcases ceremonial masks and totem poles, limited-edition prints, and bentwood boxes. The beaded moccasins and hand-carved “talking sticks” make for great souvenirs.

What started as a tiny consignment shop in the indie district around King Edward Avenue has grown into the neighborhood’s premiere boutique for all things antique and secondhand. Find vintage leather clutches and bags alongside baby toys, kitchenware, printed stationery, and more.

Straight out of National Geographic--or Ripley's Believe It or Not--this kooky collection of travel mementos occupies a back room at a Main Street antique shop.

This Prohibition-era inspired restaurant and bar overlooks the Maple Tree Square section of historic Gastown. Owned by a handful of bartending veterans, the intimate, neighborhood venue serves Asian-influenced small plates like bánh mì and gyoza.

This boutique in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood carries a carefully selected collection of jackets, knits, dresses, and other casual wear for women. The petite shop's tightly curated inventory means clothing is often stocked just one-per-size so popular items are snapped up quickly.

Vancouverites have a never-ending love affair with this 1,000-acre spread of temperate rainforest, which occupies the entire northwest end of Vancouver’s downtown peninsula.

Vancouver’s closest mountain for skiing and hiking sits eight miles north of Downtown, and it’s open year-round. A modern tram brings visitors to the summit, some 3,700 feet above the city (be sure to bring your camera—the views are stunning in every season).

A spindle whorl is a stone disc that serves as a weight to maintain the momentum of a spindle in a spinning wheel. This one, carved out of Canadian red cedar by indigenous artist Susan A. Point, is a mammoth example that represents the art of the Coast Salish, a First Nations tribe.

This classically designed 'scholars' garden in Vancouver's Chinatown was the first of its kind built outside of Asia. Named in honor of Dr.

From sporting events to summer festivals, this year-round, open-air facility touts the biggest cable-supported retractable roof in the world. Originally opened in 1983, the stadium underwent a massive renovation and reopened in 2011.

The trendy South Granville shopping district is home to this popular home decorating boutique known for its feminine style. Twinkling chandeliers, mirrored chests, mercury-glass lamps, and quirky handcrafted tableware share showroom space with Bèrgere chairs and custom sofas.

The Pacific Northwest’s cool waters are teeming with colorful, fascinating sea-life—and the recently expanded Vancouver Aquarium brings these abundant creatures into easy view.

One of the five largest film festivals in North America, the two-week Vancouver International Film Festival (VIFF) was first founded in 1982.

Housed inside the international terminal inside the Vancouver International Airport, The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, known as the Jade Canoe, is the second bronze casting of this famous sculpture.

Operating in False Creek since 1982, this ferry service is the original one providing transport aboard its fleet of 10 vessels, which includes four 20-passenger diesel-powered ferries. The Little Blue Ferries offers routes to several destinations, including the Maritime Museum, Stamps Landing, an