Utah

Things to do in Utah

With its rugged and diverse landscape, Utah offers a wild playground for adventure seekers. Whether hiking, biking, climbing, skiing or white water rafting, there are so many things to do in Utah.

One of the most authentic way to explore the dramatic scenery is on foot and hiking one of the 12 National Parks will offer breathtaking views and scenery that will stun even the most seasoned hikers. From jagged canyons in Zion Park, to the vast desert in Monument Valley to the imposing stone arches in the aptly named Arches National Park, the hiking possibilities are never-ending and ever changing.

Wondering what to do in Utah during the winter? With 14 ski resorts Utah boasts “the Greatest snow on Earth”. From the family friendly Wolf Mountain to the steep peaks of Snowbird and Alta, Utah has ski resorts from everyone.

Other things to do in Utah include visiting the Clark Planetarium or the Natural History Museum in Salt Lake City, celeb spotting at Sundance Film Festival in January or road tripping through the scenic byways. With so many outdoor pursuits you could spend decades finishing a list of what to do in Utah.

For a grand tour, make the 18-mile drive to the point, stopping at the park’s 13 spectacular viewpoints along the way back. Take the 23-mile Under-the-Rim Trail between Bryce and Rainbow Point, with eight backcountry campsites (you’ll need a permit).

During late spring and summer, crowds are a fact of life here, but these guides can steer you through the lesser-known hikes.

Pack a picnic (sans alcohol) for an alfresco concert at this 2,000-seat amphitheater, surrounded by the cliffs of Zion National Park.

Between July and October, the city hosts the Tony Award-winning Utah Shakespeare Festival; check out a production in the town’s authentic replica of the Globe Theatre (among other venues).

Capitol Reef was established around a massive, 100-mile-long wrinkle in the earth’s crust called the Waterpocket Fold (the “reef” in the park name). This awesome and colorful mountainous layer cake showcases 10,000 feet—and 270 million years—of sedimentary history.

Visit the gorgeous 2,000-foot-deep gorge.

Do you fear being in narrow or enclosed spaces? This route in the Utah desert, near Escalante, is a claustrophobe’s worst nightmare. Peek-a-boo Gulch is a slot canyon and a popular hike in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument that cuts through sandstone bedrock as a narrow slit.