U.S.

U.S. Travel Guide

A serene nail salon that's beloved by beauty editors, TenOverTen is a spot where you'll feel more relaxed as soon as you walk in.

One of the neighborhood’s most popular draws, Brooklyn Brewery was one of the first craft brewers around when it opened in 1988. Today, it produces 26 styles throughout the year, and regularly hosts tours throughout the week.

It was only a matter of time before Williamsburg got its own winery. This one, with 18 locally made, award-winning wines, offers flights, curated cheese and charcuterie plates to accompany tastings, and communal seating to encourage sharing notes.

When Williamsburg was still bereft of a cinema, Nitehawk came in with a decidedly Brooklyn approach. It installed a bar and lounge on the main floor, for before- or after-show lingering. Upstairs, by the screening rooms, another bar serves guests while they wait to be seated.

This dramatic suspension bridge stretches 2,120 feet over the Penobscot River, and there’s a slight Fritz Lang feel to its pointed towers and taught, isosceles cables.

Acadia’s 45-mile carriage road system is the legacy of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who built the broken-stone roadways to allow for car-free transportation around handsome and hilly Mount Desert Island.

One of New England’s more classic covered bridges, this postcard-perfect wooden bridge near Bethel earned its nickname from the hordes of painters and sketchers who’ve set up an easel nearby. Built in 1872, it’s been closed to traffic for more than 50 years, but the artists keep coming.

The bridge connecting Orr’s Island to Bailey Island, far out in Casco Bay, is one of Maine’s more photographed sites. Also known as the Cribstone Bridge, it’s a low and graceful arc of granite slabs stacked in a cribbing pattern, with space in between so the tide can come and out freely.

There’s an elegant swoop to the cables of this suspension bridge across Eggemoggin Reach, connecting the mainland to Deer Isle (home to the famed Haystack Mountain School of Crafts) by way of Little Deer Isle. At low tide, watch for clam diggers on the adjacent flats. 

Sardine and clam factories here once had tiny Brooklin booming, but the area today is quiet and pastoral. Sailboats and pleasure boats bob in the protected waters now, along with the old-school wooden boats for which Brooklin is renowned.