Umbria Travel Guide

Drizzle truffled honey on slices of young pecorino at this wonderful truffle shop near Città di Castello.

This long-established producer makes chemical-free wines: Umbria Terra dei Preti has an intense, flinty flavor, and the bottles have charming old-fashioned green-and-white labels. Arrange a tasting in the cellars of the vineyard's gray stone farmhouse.

Moderate and challenging walks (and a few small-ship cruises) in 80 destinations around the world with a roster of insider guides, such as Morocco native Saida Ezzahoui, an expert on native flora and fauna.

Select a bottle of syrupy black vinegar—make sure it’s labeled tradizionale, which means it’s made from aged grape must with no added sugar.

Frescoes depicting the life of Saint Francis and others by Renaissance artist Benozzo Gozzoli, a pupil of Fra Angelico, fill this deconsecrated church.

Given the unknowableness of what moves a luxury product, Cashmere-giant Cucinelli’s conviction that benevolent ideology motors his company is as good as any. Last year he had gross profits of $9 million on sales of $165 million.

Stop by for a degustazione in the bio-architectural headquarters, constructed with radon-free travertine stone. Taste the Montefalco Sagrantino red, made from Sagrantino grapes, with sweet hints of blackberry and persimmon.

The weaving studio is located in a small workshop in Perugia's San Francesco delle Donne, a deconsecrated 13th-century church. Founded by Giuditta Brozzetti in 1921 to showcase the handwork of village women, it's now managed by her daughter and granddaughter.

Owner Francesco Antano organizes tastings by appointment amid metal and wooden barrels in a modern farmhouse cellar. The Sagrantino Colleallodole red is a limited-edition 14-degree cru reminiscent of wild berries.