U Street

U Street Travel Guide

The bronze Spirit of Freedom statue and the Wall of Honor, which is etched with the names of 209,145 servicemen, commemorate the United States Colored Troops. Across the street, the heartfelt museum relates the hardships and victories of African Americans before, during, and after the Civil War.

The rustic-gourmet grocer specializes in edibles from Lancaster County produced by Pennsylvania Amish and Mennonite farmers. Pickings include flavored popcorn, freshly baked breads, jams, cheeses, Soupergirl soups and, for dessert, whoopie pies, and stroopies.

A constellation of jazz legends–Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway, for example–have lit up this celebrated music venue, which opened in 1926. Today, the club hosts national and local acts who jam in an intimate space that resembles a cool secret cave, complete with faux-rock walls.

The TV- and martini-free watering hole is heavy on the German brews and good intentions: 25 cents of each tab goes to charity. To date, the bar has helped build 15 schools in such developing countries as Uganda, Nicaragua, and Laos.

The boutique features a rotating cast of 12 designers (all local, minus the co-owner’s Wisconsin mother) who create clothes, accessories, and jewelry out of repurposed and recycled materials.

Located in the U Street neighborhood, this mid-city restaurant and bar serving New American cuisine inspired by local farms and seasonal produce. The interior boasts dimly lit wall sconces and exposed brick walls.

The lodestar of this block’s constellation of eclectic housewares shops, Go Mama Go! is packed with a funky mix of Japanese ceramics, Murano glassware, bright Marimekko textiles, and decorative Asian tiles.

Located on Connecticut Avenue in Woodley Park, Carbon is known for its selection of stylish, eco-friendly shoes, clothing, and accessories. The store, which opened in 2004, carries items from small, independent brand and designers that fit its sustainable chic mantra.

The city’s coolest jazz plays day and night at this groovy, dim-lit classic.

Wild Women Wear Red sells sexy but practical shoes, such as puzzle-patterned suede boots by Camper and Lisa Nading loafers with kittenish heels.

Opened in 1992, this northwest D.C. store has been selling unique, vintage, and mid-century modern home furnishings for more than a decade. The U Street shop is filled with interesting, designer pieces that appeal to collectors, as well as shoppers seeking functional home furnishings.

A boisterous thirtysomething crowd fills both floors of this popular watering hole: the ground-floor bistro has seats for dinner or an alt-sceney drink, while the dance club underground throbs with everything from retro-soul to electronica.

This bi-level gallery is located at the intersection of 14th and U Streets in the U Street Corridor. The 1,000-square-foot Project 4 displays international, contemporary art exhibits from artists such as Margaret Boozer and Jonathan Trundle.

Founded by Christopher Reiter following a four-year stay in Asia, Muléh is a unique lifestyle store blending home furnishings and fashion. The home furnishings for sale reflect a decidedly modern, Asian aesthetic.

This trendy boutique, located in the U Street Corridor sells fashion-forward, offbeat apparel and accessories for women.