Tuscany

Tuscany Travel Guide

Angiolini's three modernized palazzi carry the latest looks from Gucci, Prada, and Marni, along with niche labels, such as Dosa and Haute by Vincenzo De Cotiis.

These new-style Brunellos balance their heft with caressing fruit.

The jewelry shop is divine with a 17th-century safe, bright frescoes, and its outstanding collection of silver, watches, and unusual objects such as Neapolitan corni (horns), amulets carved out of red coral that are imputed to ward off the evil eye.

Sniff out a whole world—licorice, citrus, tobacco—in slow twirlings of fabled Avignonesi vin santo on the winery’s property overlooking the Sienese hills. The meats for they serve for lunch are cooked in a rotisserie of special design. The designer? One Leonardo de Vinci.

Colle di Val d'Elsa's fairy tale-like Vilca studio produces some of the area's most imaginative crystal ware.

Beneath the vaulted showrooms of Busatti sit the original looms that the Busatti-Sassolinis have used to make linens since 1842. Traditional striped table sets in yellow and blue are the most coveted items.

The church's sacristy contains Jacopo della Quercia’s magnificent Gothic tomb of a poor young dear who died in childbirth, her noble dog loyally roosting by her feet.

This contemporary gallery showcases Tuscan artist Sandro Chia and avant-garde duo Christo and Jeanne-Claude.

Stop in at Caffé della Posta, on the main square, to try one of Bolgheri’s reds: first produced in the 1980’s, these wines now rival French Bordeaux.

On the grounds of the 800-year-old estate you'll find Etruscan ruins dating to 600 B.C., a 12th-century fortress, a Gothic chapel, and an amazing Lorenzetti fresco in the Chiesa di San Michele Arcangelo. But the real focus is the food and wine, of course.