Tuscany

Tuscany Travel Guide

Colle di Val d'Elsa's fairy tale-like Vilca studio produces some of the area's most imaginative crystal ware.

Beneath the vaulted showrooms of Busatti sit the original looms that the Busatti-Sassolinis have used to make linens since 1842. Traditional striped table sets in yellow and blue are the most coveted items.

The church's sacristy contains Jacopo della Quercia’s magnificent Gothic tomb of a poor young dear who died in childbirth, her noble dog loyally roosting by her feet.

This contemporary gallery showcases Tuscan artist Sandro Chia and avant-garde duo Christo and Jeanne-Claude.

Stop in at Caffé della Posta, on the main square, to try one of Bolgheri’s reds: first produced in the 1980’s, these wines now rival French Bordeaux.

On the grounds of the 800-year-old estate you'll find Etruscan ruins dating to 600 B.C., a 12th-century fortress, a Gothic chapel, and an amazing Lorenzetti fresco in the Chiesa di San Michele Arcangelo. But the real focus is the food and wine, of course.

Archaeology buffs should head to the site where the remains of several ancient Roman ships are being unearthed, proving that this inland city was once a major port. Closed Mondays. Reservations should be made at least five days in advance.

Best flavors: ginger, pumpkin, and saffron.

The Cabernet-dominated Ornellaia has the big name, but the lush, all-Merlot Masseto is the collector’s prize.

A hydrangea-scented refuge abutting the walls, and the most geometrically lovely spot in Lucca, a copse of bamboo reaching up to the San Frediano bell tower.

The shop makes Tuscany's most exclusive, sought-after cheeses.

Carlo Fagiani's leather workshop, specialising in shoes, handbags, belts, wallets and jackets, is one of the best in Tuscany. He makes shoes to measure and if you don't have time to collect them he will send them to your home by courier.