Tuscany

Restaurants in Tuscany

White candles illuminate the communal wooden tables at the family-run L’Enoteca Marcucci, a lively wine bar and restaurant. Michele Marcucci plies wines from his 2,000 label–strong cellar, while his father, Giuseppe, grills butter-soft Tuscan beefsteaks.

The outdoor terrace is seductively shrouded in bougainvillea and the aromas of a superior kitchen. Tuck into a langoustine that might as well be butter, amazing red mullet, fatty raw oysters, and a sauce of balsamic, oil, pepper, salt, and, yes, fellow kebab-defenders, soy.

At de Bondt chocolate shop by the Arno, Paul de Bondt, congenial, long-haired, and Dutch, was one of the original leaders of Tuscany’s cioccolate artigianale movement, blending exotic fine cacao beans long before the Pisa-Pistoia-Florence triangle became branded as “Tuscan Chocolate Vall

Start the day with cappuccinos and cornetti at this small café, which recently opened opposite a colorful Keith Haring street mural.

Firouz Galdo, an Iranian-born architect working in Rome, was brought in to create a contemporary space full of light, wood, and pewter—the whole thing could easily sit atop a Hong Kong skyscraper. Grano Salis, full of young locals, is certainly in the pro-kebab camp.

The refined, double-Michelin-starred restaurant combines impeccable service with Chef Gaetano Trovato’s creative dishes (suckling pig with cabbage pie and green apples) and sweeping views of the Tuscan hills.

The beach restaurant La Pineta may cater to Tuscan cognoscenti, but down-to-earth owner Luciano Zazzeri (a former fisherman) still gets his catch from his family’s boats. Try his take on the Livornese specialty caicciucco, a frothy soup made from wine, garlic, and branzino.

Lombardo specializes in very honest Lucchese cuisine, such as the stewed codfish with leek, and also represents some decent and inexpensive local wines.