Restaurants in Tuscany

The refined, double-Michelin-starred restaurant combines impeccable service with Chef Gaetano Trovato’s creative dishes (suckling pig with cabbage pie and green apples) and sweeping views of the Tuscan hills.

The beach restaurant La Pineta may cater to Tuscan cognoscenti, but down-to-earth owner Luciano Zazzeri (a former fisherman) still gets his catch from his family’s boats. Try his take on the Livornese specialty caicciucco, a frothy soup made from wine, garlic, and branzino.

Lombardo specializes in very honest Lucchese cuisine, such as the stewed codfish with leek, and also represents some decent and inexpensive local wines.

For a lunch of expertly selected cheeses and cured meats, stop at La Vena di Vino, a no-frills wine bar with barrel-vaulted cellars. The pecorino cheese served with crystalline acacia honey is a standout.

A tiny restaurant with a delicious cecina (chickpea pancake) and thin-crust pizzas, is always first-rate.

The famous Michelin-starred La Mora still keeps tradition in check after 143 years with its inventive cooking.

A five-minute drive north of Lucca is the glass- walled dining room at the Michelin-starred Ristorante La Mora. With just 10 tables, the low-key restaurant is disturbed only occasionally by the faint roar of a passing train.

Sample Livorno’s famous dish, cacciucco, at Trattoria Antico Moro, a seafood restaurant that smells entirely like its wares. Cacciucco is one of several local dishes that have Jewish origins, a metaphor for multicultural Livorno.

Chefs Omar Barsacchi and Gionata d’Alessi serve Tuscan-Maremman cuisine like ravioli stuffed with pappa al pomodoro.