Tuscany

Restaurants in Tuscany

A classic trattoria in a 19th-century former grocer’s shop, the convivial Osteria Le Logge is owned by local celebrity Gianni Brunelli, thrice married to the same lucky woman. Brunelli rears his own Sienese belted pigs.

The owners used to have a popular shack by the sea and now they’ve gone big in the city, creating an outdoor summertime oasis favored by up-to-date locals—everywhere you look you’ll spot those famous Lucchese schnozzes buried tide-deep in fish.

With its rough-hewn ceiling, vintage cupboard wall hangings, and 1950's furnishing, Le Chiavi d'Oro wins the prize for the region's most outlandishly decorated restaurant.

An airy, pleasantly undistinguished space smack-dab by the walls of Lucca.

At the touristy but still vital Buca di Sant Antonio restaurant, lunch on grilled baby goat cooked on the spit along with an artichoke pudding.

White candles illuminate the communal wooden tables at the family-run L’Enoteca Marcucci, a lively wine bar and restaurant. Michele Marcucci plies wines from his 2,000 label–strong cellar, while his father, Giuseppe, grills butter-soft Tuscan beefsteaks.

The outdoor terrace is seductively shrouded in bougainvillea and the aromas of a superior kitchen. Tuck into a langoustine that might as well be butter, amazing red mullet, fatty raw oysters, and a sauce of balsamic, oil, pepper, salt, and, yes, fellow kebab-defenders, soy.

At de Bondt chocolate shop by the Arno, Paul de Bondt, congenial, long-haired, and Dutch, was one of the original leaders of Tuscany’s cioccolate artigianale movement, blending exotic fine cacao beans long before the Pisa-Pistoia-Florence triangle became branded as “Tuscan Chocolate Vall