Tuscany

Hotels in Tuscany

Set on a peninsula fronting Lake Bilancino, this villa occupies 44 private wooded acres in the Mugello hills. Abandoned by its noble family in 1963, Villa Le Maschere fell into disrepair, until a painstaking five-year restoration revived much of its late-Renaissance glory.

You can admire a view of Monte Amiata from the minimalist terrace at this B&B, opened last May by John Voigtmann, an erstwhile Manhattan music executive.

A beautifully renovated farmhouse two hours from Rome. When we arrived late at night, the chef was still up, and he fixed us the first of many delicious meals. We never saw a menu—we just learned to trust his instincts in the kitchen.

Lemon-scented gardens and a facade attributed to Michelangelo at a 15th-century hilltop Renaissance villa.

Kick your cooking skills up a notch at Tuscany’s “wine resort” Badia a Coltibuono, which means “abbey of the good harvest.” The 1,000-year-old former abbey, outside Florence, has 10 surprisingly spacious guest rooms (eight were actually monks’ cells), with furniture from the 16th century, white-m

Quiet inn minutes from central Lucca.

In 2002, transplanted Scottish restaurateurs David and Catherine Gardner discovered a ruin in Chianti and turned it into the wisteria-covered Villa Bordoni.

Close to the wine-producing village of Montepulciano, this 18th-century house is fresh from an eight-year restoration of its antiques-filled rooms. Outside, there’s a 1930’s swimming pool with Neoclassical fountains.

This Florence-based agency has a roster of 100 Tuscan villas. Well-connected owner Veronica Ficcarelli goes out of her way to book drivers, chefs, and cultural experts for her clients. The agency also represents 40 estates in and around Siena.