Tuscany

Things to do in Tuscany

As a region, Tuscany has inspired thousands of years of artwork and innovation, and the landmarks that remain make it one of the most popular tourist destinations in the World. No matter your interests, the possibilities for things to do in Tuscany are endless.

Credited as the birthplace of the Renaissance, Tuscany gets much of its color from the iconic masterpieces that call it home. A list of things to do in Tuscany wouldn’t be complete without a visit to Florence and its many galleries and museums, including the Uffizi, Pitti Palace and more. In the course of an afternoon, art lovers can take in works by Michelangelo, Botticelli, Da Vinci and more.

Much of Tuscany’s cultural identity is tied to Christianity, and its hillsides are dotted with quaint stone villages, each with their own cathedrals. Hike or bike between these hamlets to take in fresh air and rural landscapes, or take your outdoor adventuring to Tuscany’s picturesque coastline.

Picks for what to do in Tuscany also revolve around the area’s rich culinary tradition. Dig into hearty fare at one of its top-notch restaurants, or tour one of its many resident vineyards and sample its famous wines straight from the barrel.

If your list of what to do in Tuscany includes ample time for relaxation, make sure to book a day at one of the region’s full-service spas, or take a soak in an ancient Roman thermal bath.

Brother and sister Alessio and Cecilia Tessieri launched the chocolate company Amedei in La Rotta 18 years ago. Alessio sources the cocoa beans, while Cecilia oversees the toasting and delicate conching of the decadent stuff.

Spend five nights at a 900-year-old agriturismo in Chianti where, in July 2009, locavore author Michael Pollan kicked off a series of cooking classes and lectures. In fall 2009, chef Jamie Kennedy teaches you to prepare Tuscan specialties.

Carved horse heads and Roman gods crowd the studio’s shelves. But collector-worthy contemporary pieces, such as transparent spiral candleholders and striped vases, also abound.

Sniff out a whole world—licorice, citrus, tobacco—in slow twirlings of fabled Avignonesi vin santo on the winery’s property overlooking the Sienese hills. The meats for they serve for lunch are cooked in a rotisserie of special design. The designer? One Leonardo de Vinci.

Beneath the vaulted showrooms of Busatti sit the original looms that the Busatti-Sassolinis have used to make linens since 1842. Traditional striped table sets in yellow and blue are the most coveted items.

The church's sacristy contains Jacopo della Quercia’s magnificent Gothic tomb of a poor young dear who died in childbirth, her noble dog loyally roosting by her feet.

The shop makes Tuscany's most exclusive, sought-after cheeses.

Imagine Palm Beach's Worth Avenue transplanted to a Tuscan hillside with prices slashed up to 70 percent.

Beneath the unassuming storefront are block-long subterranean caves filled with unexpected finds, such as 1970’s California Cabernets. The vaults are as enchanting for a child as for a wine lover.