Turkey

Turkey Travel Guide

Wines from this tiny Aegean island are gaining prominence.

The Hagia Sophia, the Blue Mosque, the Topkapi Palace, and the underground cistern of Yerebatan Sarniçi all reside within the ancient neighborhood.

This family-owned Turkish chain sells lovely and unusual pieces that reflect Turkey’s cultural heritage. The designers use precious and semiprecious metals and gems to create contemporary drop necklaces, rings, and bracelets inspired by Byzantine and Ottoman Empire designs.

The museum houses a small but impressive collection of statues and other objects uncovered in the ruins of Ephesus. The most famous exhibits are the multi-breasted statues of the Ephesian Artemis.

Cult favorite Ümit Ünal, a longtime neighborhood resident, sells his avant-garde women’s designs here.

Not only does Istanbul’s chicest set live in the Nisantisi neighborhood in Istanbul, they shop there too.

The sheer number of carpet stores in Istanbul, particularly in the Sultanahmet area, can be overwhelming, but Noah’s Ark has an excellent reputation for honesty, quality, and a willingness to educate customers without pressuring them (much) to buy.

The rapidly gentrifying side streets between Cihangir and İstiklâl Caddesi are lined with shops selling antiques, furniture, and weird-but-wonderful junk.

The 19th-century mansion in Emirgan houses an impressive collection of Ottoman paintings.

In the stranglehold that eventually throttled Constantinople in 1453, the Rumeli Hisar (castle) served as the lynch pin. Constructed on the narrowest point of the Bosphorus north of the city, it blocked Byzantine access to the Black Sea.

This massive, dazzling, and cacophonous covered market is the ur-bazaar of the Orient; if you’ve envisioned what it will be like, prepare to have your expectations exceeded.

If you want to bring baklava back home, don’t buy it in the city—you’ll get syrup all over your luggage. Buy it here.