Toronto

Toronto Travel Guide

Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky captures the world’s industrially changed landscape—orange nickel tailings flowing like lava over Ontario fields, tires piled by the thousands in rural California.

Located in Terminal 1 of Toronto Pearson International Airport, this offshoot of the Colorado-based sweet shop sells a huge selection of handmade chocolates and candies.

Established in 1876 by the Ontario Society of Artists, the Ontario College of Art & Design (OCAD) in downtown Toronto has grown to become the third largest professional art and design school in North America.

A stones throw from University of Toronto's main campus, Queen's Park is the home of the Ontario Legislature.

This quirky gallery and boutique is known for its offbeat exhibitions and designer home furnishings. Launched in 2007, MOTI was one of the first upmarket shops to put down roots on this once-gritty strip of now-prime downtown real estate in hipster-centric Beaconsfield Village.

Even the weariest luggage schleppers can recharge at :10 Minute Manicure, a chain offering breezy mini-spa treatments at dozens of airports around North America.

Everything you could want for a cozy, tech-supported flight is here—including noise-canceling headphones, hard-sided carry-ons, and cushy neck pillows. Slip your feet into the shop’s leg massagers for a relaxing boost before boarding.

Open Tuesday through Saturday, this centuries-old indoor market hosts an average of 120 merchants selling everything from fresh produce and artisan cheeses to kitchen accessories and hand-tied flower bouquets.

Canada's biggest airport hosts an average of 32 million passengers, and 400,000 flights per year. Pearson's two terminals, the somewhat confusingly named Terminal 1 and Terminal 3, are connected by the frequently running LINK train.

Travelers kill stopover time with a trip back to the late-Jurassic period (150 million years ago). Pearson's Terminal 1 is home to a diorama showcasing two models cast from the Royal Ontario Museum's collection of dinosaur fossils.

This truly refreshing venture from Cart Wheels (which operates those ubiquitous mini-stores set along mall thoroughfares around the world) carries only 100 percent fair-trade, ecologically minded merchandise.

The only Canadian museum dedicated solely to ceramics, the Gardiner showcases a collection of more than 3,000 pieces, ranging from ancient Mayan figurines to 17th-century English Delftware and dynamic contemporary pieces.

Over the course of its 125-year history, Kensington Market’s composition has closely reflected immigration trends in this multicultural city. Circa-1880s, it housed working-class Irish and Scottish migrant laborers.