Toronto

Toronto Travel Guide

If you want to see a natural wonder other than Niagara Falls, why not stop by the Scarborough Bluffs? Several parks allow you access to the cliff tops for a spectacular view of Lake Ontario but be warned that walking up the cliffs can be quite difficult! If you like self-guided tours and food, go to the tourism office in Toronto and pick up a brochure entitled “Taste Trail.” This tour is a great way to test your culinary limits by sampling as much Toronto food and drink as possible.

If you plan on visiting Toronto in late September, go be a part of the ten-day Toronto International Film Festival. Films are screened from all over the world at the Bell Lightbox, right next to the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Another late-season event not to miss is the Winter Festival of Lights. From November to mid-January, over one hundred and twenty-five animated displays are put up, and millions of trees are decorated all over the city. As if the massive lights display weren’t amazing enough, it’s all close to Niagara Falls!

Located within the Sheraton Gateway Hotel, which adjoins Pearson International Airport's Terminal 3, this small salon has a menu of pampering services for weary travelers. The full treament menu includes everything from hair cuts to facials, even tanning.

Displayed in Terminal 1, this glimmering, double-sided figure was created by local sculptor Harold Town in 1963. Comprised of 60 individual panels of brass, the 8-by-20-foot sculpture is etched with intricate, abstract patterns that resemble cryptic hieroglyphics.

Opened in 2006, the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts was specifically built for opera and ballet performances with an emphasis on outstanding acoustics.

Hidden behind a narrow storefront in Little Portugal, this unassuming bar is marked by a large sign that reads Nazare Snack Bar (the building’s previous inhabitant) as well as a discreet chalkboard sign revealing the current name. As such, the clientele is largely limited to in-the-know locals.

The Royal Ontario Museum, located near Queen’s Park and the University of Toronto, attracts over a million people each year. Opened to the public in 1914, the Neo-Romanesque brick façade received a dazzling—if controversial—upgrade in 2007 with the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal wing.

This downtown cocktail bar takes its style cues from Manhattan's circa-1950s and -60s cocktail lounges with sleek black booths and wallpaper featuring old magazine covers.

Looking to inspire on-flight creativity? Breeze by the glass display cases here to see the fruits of the Origami Society of Toronto’s labor: airplanes and motorcycles composed of crisply creased paper.

If you need a gift to bring home, forget the maple-leaf key chains—most people would prefer Lindt’s Swiss-made chocolates any day. The best bet: a box of melt-in-your-mouth truffles in flavors like dark chocolate, raspberry, mint, and hazelnut.

Most trips take expert planning, and even more so in the challenging Arctic Circle environment. Trusted by Disney, IMAX, and National Geographic, Arctic Kingdom has built a decade-long reputation for small-group, safari-style wildlife viewing, backed up with expert planning and logistics.

One of the largest art museums in North America, the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) showcases more than 80,000 works dating from A.D. 100 to present day.

Since leading its first tour in 1966, Butterfield has built a reputation for its active-luxury travel. With the belief that the best way to travel is by bike, foot, or boat, the company now offers more than 100 trips in about 40 countries across the world.

When you tire of stuffy airport smells, a stroll into this meadow-fresh Canadian bath-and-beauty chain does wonders. The products here are made largely from organic fruits and vegetables and are so fresh they often call for refrigeration.

Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky captures the world’s industrially changed landscape—orange nickel tailings flowing like lava over Ontario fields, tires piled by the thousands in rural California.

Located in Terminal 1 of Toronto Pearson International Airport, this offshoot of the Colorado-based sweet shop sells a huge selection of handmade chocolates and candies.

A stones throw from University of Toronto's main campus, Queen's Park is the home of the Ontario Legislature.