Toronto Travel Guide

This truly refreshing venture from Cart Wheels (which operates those ubiquitous mini-stores set along mall thoroughfares around the world) carries only 100 percent fair-trade, ecologically minded merchandise.

The only Canadian museum dedicated solely to ceramics, the Gardiner showcases a collection of more than 3,000 pieces, ranging from ancient Mayan figurines to 17th-century English Delftware and dynamic contemporary pieces.

Over the course of its 125-year history, Kensington Market’s composition has closely reflected immigration trends in this multicultural city. Circa-1880s, it housed working-class Irish and Scottish migrant laborers.

Located in Beaconsfield Village along Ossington Ave., this stylish boutique is known for its luxe tees and sweats, artfully draped dresses and knits, impeccably tailored coats, and chunky handcrafted jewelry.

Frequent flyer miles aren't required to access this fee-entry airport lounge that's located on Level 3 of Terminal 1 in the International Departures area.

One of Canada’s most beloved bath and beauty chains, Fruits & Passion is literally for everyone—the label’s yummy potions even include organic massage oils for babies and men’s and women’s fragrances. The fruit-extract bath foams make for relaxing post-trip soaks.

Founded by Sara Parisotto and Hamid Samad, Commute Home sells original furniture and home accessories. Located in The Annex neighborhood, the shop has unique items ranging from filament bulb light fixtures to a plaster antique mirror.

Since its start in 1975, Toronto International Film Festival has grown to become one of world’s best, considered by many to be second only to Cannes.

The namesake store of the trendy Drake Hotel, this nontraditional gift shop sells a wide array of unusual souvenirs, original antiques, local art, and items imported from across the globe.

Located in Beaconsfield Village, Virginia Johnson's eponymous shop showcases the illustrator and textile artist's silkscreens on a variety of fashionable media.

This three-year public outdoor art installation—on the airport grounds and easily visible on the drive to and from the terminals—includes large-scale sculptures by Michel de Broin, Carl Skelton, and Ilan Sandler.

The airport’s jostling crowds make it easy to forget that Toronto’s landscapes were once completely inhabited by Inuit peoples, like the indigenous Nunavut.

Located inside Stephen Bulger Gallery in the Queen Street West arts district, Camera is a small rentable theater with a six-by-eight-foot screen and comfortable stadium seating for up to 50 viewers.

At 1,815-feet and 5-inches, the CN Tower is the world's tallest free-standing tower (defined as a building where less than 50% of the construction is usable floor space).

Formerly GAP Adventures.