Toronto

Restaurants in Toronto

For a fusion style meal, visit the Sen5es restaurant on Wellington Street. This Toronto restaurant is one-part café and one-part modern dining room, serving up sophisticated lunches and dinners. Wayne Gretzky’s restaurant is Canadian through and through, named after the legendary hockey star. While the food is excellent, most people trek to this Toronto restaurant for the hockey memorabilia covering every wall.

If you want to purchase some groceries and do your own cooking, then visit St. Lawrence or Kensington Market, two large food bazaars, that in addition to farmer’s markets, host restaurants, galleries, delis, bakeries, and grocery markets. You can also purchase a pre-made meal from places like Quik Sushi and Everyday Gourmet.

Caffé Ritazza is the place to get your tea fix. This Toronto café is located in the airport and serves foods like Panini and imported coffee and tea. Union, Toronto has a French influence and, on Sunday nights, the menu is geared more towards French cuisine. It is one of the best restaurants in Toronto. Toronto restaurants provide food from around the world from Thai to Canadian fare. The best part is that restaurants in Toronto offer many outstanding deals.

Authentic Neopolitan-style pizzas are on the menu at this Beaconsfield Village pizzeria, which uses fresh ingredients and a wood-burning oven handmade in Naples for owners Rocco Agostino and Max Rimaldi.

Located in St. Lawrence, this global fusion restaurant is owned by chef Claudio Aprile, also of nearby Colborne Lane. The lively interior is designed with reclaimed brick walls, a central open kitchen, and a quirky chandelier comprised of miniature monster figures.

Once as a small family restaurant in Toronto and now a fast food chain, Veda presents a new approach to fast food by serving slow-cooked Indian cuisine in a fast-paced environment.

Claudio Aprile has a unique distinction; he’s the only chef to be awarded six out of five stars from Toronto.com, and his fine dining restaurant, located just east of the Financial District, has been covered by publications like GQ and Food & Wine.

This chain of British-import coffee shops offers surprisingly tasty food. Stop in for panini or ciabatta sandwiches, Mezzalunas (olive oil–infused pizza pockets), internationally inspired salads, and hot chocolate made with Belgian couverture, milk, and zippy orange syrup.

The renovated luxury restaurant incorporates a dimly lit wine cellar with exposed beams, a casual café, fine dining area, chic bar, and lounge space, as well as an events room for private bookings.

Lee

From his humble beginnings in a Hong Kong hotel kitchen, chef Susur Lee now brings his internationally-known talents to LEE restaurant in the King West neighborhood. Inside, the restaurant boasts bright red walls, candle lit tables, and floor-to-ceiling windows.

ONE

A mecca for well-to-do Canadian socialites and international celebrities, gold rims nearly everything at One Restaurant in Yorkville, bill included.

Located on an up-and-coming street in the heart of West Queen West, Union, Toronto serves up culinary Canadiana in a Parisian-bistro-inspired locavore restaurant.

This restaurant shares a name—and an aesthetic—with Toronto’s streetcars. Handrails line the dark-red booths, track marks decorate the floor, and the tables all have “windows” (actually large color photos) over the city’s areas of interest.

c5 Restaurant Lounge is located on the top floor of the Royal Ontario Museum's Michael Lee-Chin Crystal wing, a 175,000 square-foot structure designed by Daniel Libeskind and composed of five interlocking prisms that render light in a cinematic style.

The oyster saloon outpost of Rodney Clark's two-restaurant bivalve empire sits on a quiet street close to the Bay Street financial district. Clark's maritime background — he's a native of Prince Edward Island, home to some of the world's best oyster beds — has made him quite knowledgeable.

Located in the super-trendy King West neighborhood, Blowfish occupies a former red brick Bank of Toronto building (which explains the high ceilings). The long, narrow space's minimalist design incorporates cool, red and blue LEDs, and limited seating is available at the sleek bar.