Toronto

Things to do in Toronto

If you want to see a natural wonder other than Niagara Falls, why not stop by the Scarborough Bluffs? Several parks allow you access to the cliff tops for a spectacular view of Lake Ontario but be warned that walking up the cliffs can be quite difficult! If you like self-guided tours and food, go to the tourism office in Toronto and pick up a brochure entitled “Taste Trail.” This tour is a great way to test your culinary limits by sampling as much Toronto food and drink as possible.

If you plan on visiting Toronto in late September, go be a part of the ten-day Toronto International Film Festival. Films are screened from all over the world at the Bell Lightbox, right next to the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Another late-season event not to miss is the Winter Festival of Lights. From November to mid-January, over one hundred and twenty-five animated displays are put up, and millions of trees are decorated all over the city. As if the massive lights display weren’t amazing enough, it’s all close to Niagara Falls!

At 1,815-feet and 5-inches, the CN Tower is the world's tallest free-standing tower (defined as a building where less than 50% of the construction is usable floor space).

Displayed in Terminal 1, this glimmering, double-sided figure was created by local sculptor Harold Town in 1963. Comprised of 60 individual panels of brass, the 8-by-20-foot sculpture is etched with intricate, abstract patterns that resemble cryptic hieroglyphics.

This downtown cocktail bar takes its style cues from Manhattan's circa-1950s and -60s cocktail lounges with sleek black booths and wallpaper featuring old magazine covers.

One of the largest art museums in North America, the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) showcases more than 80,000 works dating from A.D. 100 to present day.

Most trips take expert planning, and even more so in the challenging Arctic Circle environment. Trusted by Disney, IMAX, and National Geographic, Arctic Kingdom has built a decade-long reputation for small-group, safari-style wildlife viewing, backed up with expert planning and logistics.

Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky captures the world’s industrially changed landscape—orange nickel tailings flowing like lava over Ontario fields, tires piled by the thousands in rural California.

This quirky gallery and boutique is known for its offbeat exhibitions and designer home furnishings. Launched in 2007, MOTI was one of the first upmarket shops to put down roots on this once-gritty strip of now-prime downtown real estate in hipster-centric Beaconsfield Village.

Travelers kill stopover time with a trip back to the late-Jurassic period (150 million years ago). Pearson's Terminal 1 is home to a diorama showcasing two models cast from the Royal Ontario Museum's collection of dinosaur fossils.