Toronto

Things to do in Toronto

If you want to see a natural wonder other than Niagara Falls, why not stop by the Scarborough Bluffs? Several parks allow you access to the cliff tops for a spectacular view of Lake Ontario but be warned that walking up the cliffs can be quite difficult! If you like self-guided tours and food, go to the tourism office in Toronto and pick up a brochure entitled “Taste Trail.” This tour is a great way to test your culinary limits by sampling as much Toronto food and drink as possible.

If you plan on visiting Toronto in late September, go be a part of the ten-day Toronto International Film Festival. Films are screened from all over the world at the Bell Lightbox, right next to the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Another late-season event not to miss is the Winter Festival of Lights. From November to mid-January, over one hundred and twenty-five animated displays are put up, and millions of trees are decorated all over the city. As if the massive lights display weren’t amazing enough, it’s all close to Niagara Falls!

If you need a gift to bring home, forget the maple-leaf key chains—most people would prefer Lindt’s Swiss-made chocolates any day. The best bet: a box of melt-in-your-mouth truffles in flavors like dark chocolate, raspberry, mint, and hazelnut.

When you tire of stuffy airport smells, a stroll into this meadow-fresh Canadian bath-and-beauty chain does wonders. The products here are made largely from organic fruits and vegetables and are so fresh they often call for refrigeration.

Established in 1876 by the Ontario Society of Artists, the Ontario College of Art & Design (OCAD) in downtown Toronto has grown to become the third largest professional art and design school in North America.

A stones throw from University of Toronto's main campus, Queen's Park is the home of the Ontario Legislature.

Everything you could want for a cozy, tech-supported flight is here—including noise-canceling headphones, hard-sided carry-ons, and cushy neck pillows. Slip your feet into the shop’s leg massagers for a relaxing boost before boarding.

Canada's biggest airport hosts an average of 32 million passengers, and 400,000 flights per year. Pearson's two terminals, the somewhat confusingly named Terminal 1 and Terminal 3, are connected by the frequently running LINK train.

Over the course of its 125-year history, Kensington Market’s composition has closely reflected immigration trends in this multicultural city. Circa-1880s, it housed working-class Irish and Scottish migrant laborers.

The only Canadian museum dedicated solely to ceramics, the Gardiner showcases a collection of more than 3,000 pieces, ranging from ancient Mayan figurines to 17th-century English Delftware and dynamic contemporary pieces.

One of Canada’s most beloved bath and beauty chains, Fruits & Passion is literally for everyone—the label’s yummy potions even include organic massage oils for babies and men’s and women’s fragrances. The fruit-extract bath foams make for relaxing post-trip soaks.

Located in Beaconsfield Village, Virginia Johnson's eponymous shop showcases the illustrator and textile artist's silkscreens on a variety of fashionable media.

At 1,815-feet and 5-inches, the CN Tower is the world's tallest free-standing tower (defined as a building where less than 50% of the construction is usable floor space).

Located inside Stephen Bulger Gallery in the Queen Street West arts district, Camera is a small rentable theater with a six-by-eight-foot screen and comfortable stadium seating for up to 50 viewers.

Displayed in Terminal 1, this glimmering, double-sided figure was created by local sculptor Harold Town in 1963. Comprised of 60 individual panels of brass, the 8-by-20-foot sculpture is etched with intricate, abstract patterns that resemble cryptic hieroglyphics.

This downtown cocktail bar takes its style cues from Manhattan's circa-1950s and -60s cocktail lounges with sleek black booths and wallpaper featuring old magazine covers.

Most trips take expert planning, and even more so in the challenging Arctic Circle environment. Trusted by Disney, IMAX, and National Geographic, Arctic Kingdom has built a decade-long reputation for small-group, safari-style wildlife viewing, backed up with expert planning and logistics.