Tokyo

Tokyo Travel Guide

Often called the "Japanese Gap," Uniqlo is a fashion retailer specializing in casual, affordable clothing for men, women, and children. While the company has more than 700 stores in Japan (and others worldwide), this flagship Ginza location is its biggest and flashiest.

With everything from hardware to hobby, craft, and office supplies, even sushi-making supplies and lunch boxes, Tokyu Hands is a uniquely Japanese shopping experience and a glimpse into the country's culture.

Floor-to-ceiling windows and a 52nd-floor location give the New York Bar some of the best views in the city. You might recognize the slick, expansive space with live jazz from the movie Lost in Translation.

Japanese pastry chef Sadaharu Aoki established a reputation in Paris before opening his all-white, ultra-modern Marunouchi shop, where exquisite pastries are displayed like works of art.

Don't miss this sprawling mall known for cutting-edge Japanese labels.

A variety store in the truest sense, this member of the Tokyu Hands department-store chain sells everything from kitchen knives to camping packs.

The bold structure of undulating glass walls designed by Kisho Kurokawa is Tokyo's largest art venue.

Feel the beat of the music as omikoshi (portable shrines) mounted on palanquins are paraded through the streets of Tokyo’s Asakusa neighborhood the third weekend in May. The Shinto festival honors the founders of the Asakusa Shrine and Sensoji Temple.

The first Disney resort to be built outside the US, Tokyo Disney Resort receives more annual visitors than any of Disney's other international locations.

The Tokyo National Museum in Ueno Park is the largest repository of Japanese art and artifacts in the world, with collections spanning thousands of years and ranging from textiles and ceramics to armor, painting, sculpture, and calligraphy.

A whole store devoted to hoisery: that's Tabio, where shoppers can find anything to adorn the legs, from tights to socks to leg warmers to furry "boot covers" and "sockettes." Tabio fills a large, well-lit retail space with shelf after shelf of products for men and women, with a bent toward the c

F.I.L (shorthand for Free International Laboratory) is the boutique of Berlin-based, Japanese fashion designer Hiroki Nakamura and his visvim clothing, a high-concept line focused on creating the opposite of disposable fashion.