Tokyo Travel Guide

Escape the throngs of Ginza shoppers at this sleekly modern tearoom and shop.

A traditional onsen (hot springs) resort that dates back to the 1870's, Arai Ryokan has a serene, old-world feel, evoked by the traditional Japenese wooden-beam architecture, covered walkways and bridges, and wooded surroundings.

One of the many fashion subcultures of Tokyo is the Lolita look: bows, lace, crinolines, and bonnets. In other words, clothes that appear to belong on fairytale characters.

The Japanese fascination with patisseries is best expressed in the fruit tarts from Qu’il Fait Bon. These are works of art that must be admired before being cut into.

The Tokyo City View observation deck has floor-to-ceiling windows that provide panoramic views of Tokyo Tower, Haneda Airport, Mount Fuji, the island of Odaiba, and the Shibuya and Shinjuku districts.

A seven-meter, red-granite pool with an illuminated Jacuzzi is the centerpiece of Nagomi Spa, located at the Grand Hyatt Tokyo in Roppongi Hills. Created by acclaimed design firm Super Potato, the spa blends contemporary style with elements from old-fashioned Japanese bathhouses.

Ukiyo-e woodblock prints, a uniquely Japanese art form, are the focus of this niche museum collection, bequethed by the estate of Seizo Ota, the late chairman of a major Japanese insurance company.

Jugetsudo Japanese tea house opened its doors in 2003 in the Tsukiji district of Tokyo, next to the parent company Maruyama Nori. There you can savor delicious green tea in an atmosphere of natural and harmonious Japanese decor.

The dark, designy, one-person deep standing bar sells single servings of sake in little jars to keep the sake fresh.

To the right of the Kaminarimon—the gate opening onto Nakamise Dori, the narrow pedestrian-only shopping street leading to the Sensoji Temple—is this quaint shop specializing in washi, Japanese natural-fiber paper. It has been selling handmade paper and crafts since 1856.

Tokyo’s most impressive depachika (subterranean gourmet food market), Isetan may be the ultimate foodie destination.

The museum was designed by Richard Gluckman and houses contemporary Japanese art. The shop is worth the 52-story elevator ride for the colorful textiles.

Home to more than 200 shops, restaurants, and services, Roppongi Hills is one of Tokyo's premiere shopping destinations, located in the heart of an area that includes residences, a museum, hotels, theaters, and galleries.