Tokyo

Tokyo Travel Guide

Dog's Care Joker brings Roppongi Hills pampering to pooches.

A cross between a French patisserie and an American cupcake shop, Tokyo Sweets Factory is located on the basement level of a Jiyugaoka office building.

France's top pasty provocatuer is a household name in Tokyo, with several boutiques and a swank marbled Bar Chocolat created by Wonderwall, the cutting-edge design firm behind Uniqlo stores.

While in Asakusa do not miss this furugi (used clothing) store’s affordable secondhand kimonos. Selection and prices vary widely, and even if you are not looking for a kimono to wear, you can find beautiful material to reuse in quilts, handbags, skirts, and other crafty projects.

The bakery in the New Otani Hotel specializes in mont blanc desserts.

Operating here since 1935, the world’s largest fish market is a sight to be seen and experienced. The jonai (inner market) area for wholesale fish merchants is closed to the general public, but the jogai (outer market) is open to everyone.

With its distinctive clock tower and curved granite façade, Wako is one of the most iconic department stores in Tokyo.

Around the corner from Hermès and Chanel, Sake Shop Fukumitsuya contains an informal bar that showcases fermented rice from the Fukumitsuya brewery, which was founded in 1625. The menu lists dozens o f premium sakes and mirins, including several rare or aged vintages, served by the glass.

Often called the "Japanese Gap," Uniqlo is a fashion retailer specializing in casual, affordable clothing for men, women, and children. While the company has more than 700 stores in Japan (and others worldwide), this flagship Ginza location is its biggest and flashiest.

With everything from hardware to hobby, craft, and office supplies, even sushi-making supplies and lunch boxes, Tokyu Hands is a uniquely Japanese shopping experience and a glimpse into the country's culture.

Japanese pastry chef Sadaharu Aoki established a reputation in Paris before opening his all-white, ultra-modern Marunouchi shop, where exquisite pastries are displayed like works of art.

Floor-to-ceiling windows and a 52nd-floor location give the New York Bar some of the best views in the city. You might recognize the slick, expansive space with live jazz from the movie Lost in Translation.