Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

Kurkku Kitchen is part of Tokyo's budding green scene. Located in a modern, two-story glass and wood, architect-designed building with a turf roof, the restaurant focuses on organic produce and meat prepared with a French flair (although the restaurant's name is Finnish for a type of pickle).

The Scene: In Tokyo’s Akasaka district behind an unmarked door, whose only “sign” is engraved on the door handle, is one of the world’s smallest fine restaurants—with only two tables.

Lyonnais legend Paul Bocuse's first restaurant outside France occupies the National Art Center's stunning glass-and-steel lobby. It sits atop a three-story inverted concrete cone, but delivers down-to-earth brasserie fare, such as whitefish-mousseline quenelles in a bisque sauce.

The quintessential izakaya (Japanese tapas bar) in the heart of Tokyo’s shitamachi (old downtown) area is a third-generation, six-decades-old restaurant.

Sequestered on a side street between the edgy fashion districts of Harajuku and Aoyama, this tiny, cheerful yakitori restaurant provides welcome relief for famished shoppers roaming nearby Omotesando Hills. Free-range Nagoya Cochin chicken, a tender breed, is the specialty here.

The devotion of affluent sophisticates has made owner Kazuhiko Kinoshita a star and kept the 32 seats booked far in advance.

Located on the seventh floor of the Four Seasons Hotel in Marunouchi, Ekki is distinguished by its casual design (contemporary black lacquer furniture, upholstered banquettes) and an international menu that includes Japanese specialties such as Waygu beef, Hokkaido scallops, and creative interpre