Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

Tsukiji Market, the largest fish market on earth, is home to outstanding sushi and tempura eateries that open as early as 5:30 a.m. and close by early afternoon. Take a right from the central square to reach the row of tiny restaurants.

Japan’s traditional meal-ending confections, collectively known as wagashi, still have a passionate fan base. Often made with red-bean paste, sugar, and mochi (glutinous rice cakes), the treats were once a favored gift exchanged by samurai.

Blending traditional elements of Japanese design—such as shoji screens and tatami mats—with dramatic contemporary art and lighting, Daidaiya is a popular izakaya (drinking place) where the fashionable after-work crowd gathers to experience creative Asia-fusion "nouvelle

Set in a zen garden in Atago, Daigo is a shojin ryori (vegetarian restaurant) in the Buddhist tradition, housed in a temple building that was moved to its current location from the grounds of the nearby Daigo-ji Temple.

Ask for a seat on the outdoor terrace at this Teruo Kurosaki-owned eatery.

British celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay's Michelin-starred Tokyo venue occupies a space on the 28th floor of the tower housing the Conrad Hotel, affording light during the day and impressive urban nighttime views over the city through its floor-to-ceiling windows.

Considered one of the finest unagi (freshwater eel) houses in Japan, Michelin-starred Nodaiwa is located in a free-standing, three-story wood and plaster storehouse that was relocated from the country to its present location among the skyscrapers.

Legendary French chef Pierre Gagnaire is known for subtle dishes, meant to be eaten in progression in order to experience how the nuance of each taste builds upon the last.

Try instead the sashimi of the day and the seasonal nizakana (fish simmered in sake and soy) with rice, pickles, and soothing miso soup.

Billed as "Tokyo-style French cuisine," Sens et Saveurs is the Tokyo outpost of identical twins Jacques and Laurent Pourcel, whose Montpelier Les Jardin des Sens has earned three Michelin stars.

The locale has an entire wall of color-coordinated mini sake containers behind its handsome circular bar. Try to order their junmai and daiginjo with bites of pork-cheek yakitori, sautéed sea urchin and watercress, and fugu (blowfish) roe preserved in sake lees.

For authentic dumplings, try this local institution with lines out the door.

Part avante-garde art gallery, part dance club, part bar, Super Deluxe occupies an open basement space with concrete floors and high ceilings, decorated with contemporary furniture and a bar on wheels that serves cocktails and coffee drinks into the wee hours.

Considered by some to be the best teppanyaki (iron grill) restaurant in Tokyo, Omotoesando Ukai Tei recreates the ambience of a 19th-century wealthy merchant home with marble floors, floor-to-ceiling panel paintings, antiques in glass display cases, and dark wood and upholstered furnitur