Restaurants in Tokyo

Isetan is one of Tokyo's most popular department stores and its basement depchicka, or "food hall" (in the tradition of European stores such as Harrod's), has a mind-boggling array of food, sold deli-style from glass cases. Traditional Japanese food is only one option.

Dazzle gets its name from the star-like, LED-light-enhanced Swarovski Crystal lamps that seem to float above the cavernous dining room of this upscale restaurant in the Mikimoto Ginza 2 building.

Amid a cluster of skyscrapers, a reproduction of a Loire Valley chateau houses French culinary star Joel Robuchon's Tokyo outpost.

Located on the third floor of a Ginza office tower, Ginza Harutaka is a place known mostly to sushi lovers, especially Tokyo chefs.

A sleek and elegant izakaya (drinking place) on the fifth floor of a Marunouchi skyscraper, Daigomi features an upscale robata-yaki (charcoal grill) where expense-account diners choose the fresh ingredients for their meal from the gorgeous display in front of them.

Chef Kimio Nonaga gained acclaim as the winner of the 2002 Iron Chef competition and has catered meals for the Imperial household, but his traditional kaiseki (multi-course) restaurant, located just a few minutes from Tokyo Station, is affordable and friendly.

Some of the world’s best French restaurants can be found in Tokyo, and our favorite among them is elegant Les Saisons, in the Imperial Hotel. At the helm is Chef Thierry Voisin, who was most recently at three-Michelin-starred Les Crayères in Reims.

The brilliant fortysomething chef Yoshihiro Narisawa weds French finesse and Spanish avant-garde savvy with kaiseki aesthetics and a passion for local ingredients.

Located in the penthouse of the Chanel Building in Ginza, this Michelin two-starred restaurant is a collaboration between the French fashion house and renowned chef Alain Ducasse.

A highly ritualized, multicourse meal of “small bites,” kaiseki has evolved through the centuries as an offshoot of the Buddhist tea ceremony. Chef Yoshiaki Takahashi practices this culinary art at Kanetanaka-an, one of four Kanetanaka restaurants.

Cantonese-food fans come to this uncanny simulacrum of downtown Kowloon.

Diners at this kaiten sushi or "revolving sushi" restaurant select from a never-ending parade of sushi on conveyer belts.

A traditional ryokan (inn) on a quiet sidestreet in Kyoto, the Yoshikawa Inn presents classic Japanese hospitality in a 100-year-old building surrounded by gardens. Guests can eat at the casual twelve-seat counter or in one of nine private tatami rooms.

Tenko is known for two things: its location inside a former, wooden geisha house on a tucked-away side street in Kagurasaka and for having the best tempura in Tokyo. Seating is available at one of the eight counter spots or in the private rooms hidden by sliding shoji-screen doors.