Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

The line of salarymen descending the stairs into this ramen haven is long, but take heart:  it moves quickly, as these guys slurp like there’s no tomorrow.

Bauhaus meets Bushido at Ogata’s Higashi-yama restaurant, where everything from the impeccable seafood concoctions to the décor is the product of a rigorously creative mind. The fatty-salmon salad drizzled with yuzu sauce is edible haiku.

An impressive glass doorway marked with modern gold sculptures marks the entrance to this Michelin-starred, westernized teppanyaki (iron griddle) house, where chef Sung Lee chats in English with counter-seated guests as he prepares seasonal specialties such as salted, roasted abalone, gr

For authentic dumplings, try this local institution with lines out the door.

Part avante-garde art gallery, part dance club, part bar, Super Deluxe occupies an open basement space with concrete floors and high ceilings, decorated with contemporary furniture and a bar on wheels that serves cocktails and coffee drinks into the wee hours.

Considered by some to be the best teppanyaki (iron grill) restaurant in Tokyo, Omotoesando Ukai Tei recreates the ambience of a 19th-century wealthy merchant home with marble floors, floor-to-ceiling panel paintings, antiques in glass display cases, and dark wood and upholstered furnitur

Soba is a staple of many Japanese dishes, from soups to mori soba (a cold-noodle dish), but it's rare to find them made by hand.

One of two sushi restaurants inside the Tsukiji Fish Market, Daiwa is a traditional sushi counter with room for about a dozen sitting elbow-to-elbow in front of the busy chefs preparing the city's freshest catch for immediate consumption. Many say Daiwa is Tokyo's best sushi restaurant.

The chef is the mentor of Masa Takayama, whose $450 sushi omakase has thrilled Manhattan sushi cognoscenti since his restaurant, Masa, opened in 2004.

The accolades for chef Seji Yamamoto's Nihonryori Ryugin are impressive: three Michelin stars and status as one the world's top 50 restaurants as determined by S. Pellegrino's annual awards.

Housed in a 19th-century sake brewery that was relocated from the countryside, Tofuya Ukai sits at the base of Tokyo Tower amidst zen gardens (complete with a stream and water wheel) visible from each of the restaurant's 55 private tatami dining rooms.

It’s fun to sizzle a midday meal on a tabletop grill at this new mall staple specializing in skewerless yakitori. Try the tsukune, juicy, shiso-wrapped chicken meatballs.

In 1834, a samurai made his claim to fame with his fruit and vegetables shop, introducing the then-isolated Japan to imported produce. More than 150 years later, the fruit parlor and its reputation are still intact.