Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

For fans of soba noodles, texture is key, and noodle shop Matsugen is reputed to have perfected it. Located on the third floor of a Ginza office tower, Matsugen attracts a business lunch crowd with its quiet ambience and low-key decor: dark wood furniture with strong lines.

The house specialty is a refined version of oden (Japanese hot pot). Sit at the counter, select your oden ingredients from a large brass pot, and sip an atsu-kan (hot sake) such as the seasonal Kikuhime Junmai.

Thirty-seven floors up in the Mandrin Oriental Hotel, Michelin-starred Signature serves refined French cuisine in a rarefied atmosphere with contempoary glass lighting, old-world carved screens, and astonishing views over Tokyo from a plush, pillow-strewn upholstered banquette in front of a wall

After serving as executive chef in some of Tokyo’s top hotels, Yuki Wakiya opened this namesake Chinese restaurant in 2001.

Located inside the indoor mulit-attraction extravaganza called Namjatown, the stadium's riotous kitschy sprawl is part pinball-like pachinko parlor, part nostalgia ride through 50's Japan.

Black laquer, red accents, and floor-to-ceiling windows set the tone for French celebrity chef Joel Robuchon's Roppongi Hills venue, where diners at the the 44-seat counter watch black-clad chefs prepare creative dishes inspired by Mediterranean flavors and the simplicty of Japanese culinary trad

"Toriyoshi is a Japanese yakitori chain. This location is in the central Minato neighborhood, close to the Omotesando subway station. Don't let a bias against chains throw you off-there are great ones throughout Japan. This place has amazing ji-dori, or ground chicken.

Noted architect Kengo Kuma created the striking steel-mesh screen and glass building and design stars Super Potato concieved the modern minimalist interior, but the star of this kappo (cut and simmer) restaurant is chef Hiromitsu Nazaki, whose seasonally informed omakase menu ea

Tuck into a succulent Kurobuta-pork tonkatsu (cutlet) in a shaggy crisp panko crust.

This minimalist Ginza gem got a Michelin star for its divine kushiage (deep-fried skewers). While the wine list is excellent, happo sake (cold sparkling sake) also pairs well with kushiage.

Soba is a staple of many Japanese dishes, from soups to mori soba (a cold-noodle dish), but it's rare to find them made by hand.

In 1834, a samurai made his claim to fame with his fruit and vegetables shop, introducing the then-isolated Japan to imported produce. More than 150 years later, the fruit parlor and its reputation are still intact.

Japan's love affair with the ramen noodle is celebrated at the Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum, an interactive exhibit space that includes a ramen 'theme park' with recreated mid-20th-century ramen shops from around Japan.

A welcome lunch break when shopping in Ginza, this restaurant serves kaiseki, multicourse meals of small, traditional dishes. The emphasis is on presentation, seasonal ingredients, and exquisite service.