Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

Housed in a 19th-century sake brewery that was relocated from the countryside, Tofuya Ukai sits at the base of Tokyo Tower amidst zen gardens (complete with a stream and water wheel) visible from each of the restaurant's 55 private tatami dining rooms.

It’s fun to sizzle a midday meal on a tabletop grill at this new mall staple specializing in skewerless yakitori. Try the tsukune, juicy, shiso-wrapped chicken meatballs.

The modern, red-and-black-walled restaurant has the freshest sushi in Tokyo.

One of the last vestiges of pre-war architecture in Shinjuku, the building housing the flagship Tsunahachi tempura restaurant (there are now dozens of them all over Japan) stands out amid the nearby skyscrapers.

Isetan is one of Tokyo's most popular department stores and its basement depchicka, or "food hall" (in the tradition of European stores such as Harrod's), has a mind-boggling array of food, sold deli-style from glass cases. Traditional Japanese food is only one option.

Specializing in fish caught just hours before it's served, Yanmo is tucked away in a basement in the trendy Aoyama shopping district, offering counter seating in front of the grill, traditional low-tables on a raised wooden platform, and a private room in the back.

Teppei specializes in esoteric shochu spirits and 10 kinds of ume-shu (plum) liqueur. The narrow haunt also serves an Okinawan Spam sushi - perversely delicious. Best of all, Teppei employs the services of certified Vegetable and Fruit Meister, a.k.a.

Chef Kimio Nonaga gained acclaim as the winner of the 2002 Iron Chef competition and has catered meals for the Imperial household, but his traditional kaiseki (multi-course) restaurant, located just a few minutes from Tokyo Station, is affordable and friendly.

Some of the world’s best French restaurants can be found in Tokyo, and our favorite among them is elegant Les Saisons, in the Imperial Hotel. At the helm is Chef Thierry Voisin, who was most recently at three-Michelin-starred Les Crayères in Reims.

The brilliant fortysomething chef Yoshihiro Narisawa weds French finesse and Spanish avant-garde savvy with kaiseki aesthetics and a passion for local ingredients.

A Parisian sidewalk cafe in one of Tokyo's toniest neighborhoods, Anniversaire is a popular pit stop for shoppers who need to fuel up or relax after shopping at nearby designer stores, such as Chanel, Dior, and Prada.

Set behind a leafy, courtyard-like entryway, Yabu Soba has an Old Tokyo feel, with its dark wooden beams, paper lanterns, and seating at the counter or at low-wooden tables with cushions for seats atop tatami-mat floors.

Just two years after its opening, self-taught chef Carme Ruscellada's first reataurant in the village of San Pol de Mer north of Barcelona earned a Michelin star. In 2004, Ruscellada opened San Pau in Tokyo, and it quickly earned two stars.

"When I'm in Tokyo, I often go to a place called Dora in Shinjuku, the city's business district. Dora is a classic izakaya, which roughly translates as "pub." It attracts a high-energy crowd, and at night the booze is always flowing.

Literally translated as "pig gang", this new-wave tonkatsu temple occupies a quaint timber-framed house in a quiet residential enclave near big, bright Ropponi.