Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

Set behind a leafy, courtyard-like entryway, Yabu Soba has an Old Tokyo feel, with its dark wooden beams, paper lanterns, and seating at the counter or at low-wooden tables with cushions for seats atop tatami-mat floors.

A Parisian sidewalk cafe in one of Tokyo's toniest neighborhoods, Anniversaire is a popular pit stop for shoppers who need to fuel up or relax after shopping at nearby designer stores, such as Chanel, Dior, and Prada.

On a single street in Tsukishima (a manmade island in the city), there are approximately 50 restaurants serving monja, a kind of pancake (some say omlette) made from a batter poured atop meat or seafood, onions, and cabbage, cooked on a teppan griddle. Monja Hazama, distinguishe

Located on the edge of Aoyama National Cemetary, Kaotan Ramen has a notably shabby exterior and simple interior: a long, worn wooden table and benches across from an enclosed kitchen with an order window.

The restaurant is obscured behind a dramatic façade of weathered steel and glass. Regulars love this spot not just for the gently priced omakase menu of delicious dishes—just $50 per person—but also for his rapport with the amiable owner, Kuniatsu Kondo.

Tsukiji Market, the largest fish market on earth, is home to outstanding sushi and tempura eateries that open as early as 5:30 a.m. and close by early afternoon. Take a right from the central square to reach the row of tiny restaurants.

Japan’s traditional meal-ending confections, collectively known as wagashi, still have a passionate fan base. Often made with red-bean paste, sugar, and mochi (glutinous rice cakes), the treats were once a favored gift exchanged by samurai.

Literally translated as "pig gang", this new-wave tonkatsu temple occupies a quaint timber-framed house in a quiet residential enclave near big, bright Ropponi.

Just two years after its opening, self-taught chef Carme Ruscellada's first reataurant in the village of San Pol de Mer north of Barcelona earned a Michelin star. In 2004, Ruscellada opened San Pau in Tokyo, and it quickly earned two stars.

"When I'm in Tokyo, I often go to a place called Dora in Shinjuku, the city's business district. Dora is a classic izakaya, which roughly translates as "pub." It attracts a high-energy crowd, and at night the booze is always flowing.

Kurkku Kitchen is part of Tokyo's budding green scene. Located in a modern, two-story glass and wood, architect-designed building with a turf roof, the restaurant focuses on organic produce and meat prepared with a French flair (although the restaurant's name is Finnish for a type of pickle).

The Scene: In Tokyo’s Akasaka district behind an unmarked door, whose only “sign” is engraved on the door handle, is one of the world’s smallest fine restaurants—with only two tables.

Set in a zen garden in Atago, Daigo is a shojin ryori (vegetarian restaurant) in the Buddhist tradition, housed in a temple building that was moved to its current location from the grounds of the nearby Daigo-ji Temple.

Blending traditional elements of Japanese design—such as shoji screens and tatami mats—with dramatic contemporary art and lighting, Daidaiya is a popular izakaya (drinking place) where the fashionable after-work crowd gathers to experience creative Asia-fusion "nouvelle