Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

For authentic dumplings, try this local institution with lines out the door.

Part avante-garde art gallery, part dance club, part bar, Super Deluxe occupies an open basement space with concrete floors and high ceilings, decorated with contemporary furniture and a bar on wheels that serves cocktails and coffee drinks into the wee hours.

Considered by some to be the best teppanyaki (iron grill) restaurant in Tokyo, Omotoesando Ukai Tei recreates the ambience of a 19th-century wealthy merchant home with marble floors, floor-to-ceiling panel paintings, antiques in glass display cases, and dark wood and upholstered furnitur

It’s fun to sizzle a midday meal on a tabletop grill at this new mall staple specializing in skewerless yakitori. Try the tsukune, juicy, shiso-wrapped chicken meatballs.

The accolades for chef Seji Yamamoto's Nihonryori Ryugin are impressive: three Michelin stars and status as one the world's top 50 restaurants as determined by S. Pellegrino's annual awards.