Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

An intimate (22 seats only) tempura house in upscale Roppongi Hills, Tempura Mikawa is found behind an unmarked, sliding wooden door set into a full-wall mural of blue birds on a gold background.

Tsukemono (Japanese pickled vegetables) are the specialty at this branch of the Kyoto-based restaurant Kintame.

Surrounding the vast maze of refrigerated stalls in the centrally located Tsukiji fish market are simple spots that cater to off-duty fishmongers, still wearing their indigo overalls and insulated rubber boots. By 7 a.m.

Located on the third floor of a Ginza office tower, Ginza Harutaka is a place known mostly to sushi lovers, especially Tokyo chefs.

A sleek and elegant izakaya (drinking place) on the fifth floor of a Marunouchi skyscraper, Daigomi features an upscale robata-yaki (charcoal grill) where expense-account diners choose the fresh ingredients for their meal from the gorgeous display in front of them.