Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

Tenko is known for two things: its location inside a former, wooden geisha house on a tucked-away side street in Kagurasaka and for having the best tempura in Tokyo. Seating is available at one of the eight counter spots or in the private rooms hidden by sliding shoji-screen doors.

Diners at this kaiten sushi or "revolving sushi" restaurant select from a never-ending parade of sushi on conveyer belts.

A traditional ryokan (inn) on a quiet sidestreet in Kyoto, the Yoshikawa Inn presents classic Japanese hospitality in a 100-year-old building surrounded by gardens. Guests can eat at the casual twelve-seat counter or in one of nine private tatami rooms.

Tsukiji Market, the largest fish market on earth, is home to outstanding sushi and tempura eateries that open as early as 5:30 a.m. and close by early afternoon. Take a right from the central square to reach the row of tiny restaurants.