Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

Literally translated as "pig gang", this new-wave tonkatsu temple occupies a quaint timber-framed house in a quiet residential enclave near big, bright Ropponi.

Just two years after its opening, self-taught chef Carme Ruscellada's first reataurant in the village of San Pol de Mer north of Barcelona earned a Michelin star. In 2004, Ruscellada opened San Pau in Tokyo, and it quickly earned two stars.

"When I'm in Tokyo, I often go to a place called Dora in Shinjuku, the city's business district. Dora is a classic izakaya, which roughly translates as "pub." It attracts a high-energy crowd, and at night the booze is always flowing.

Kurkku Kitchen is part of Tokyo's budding green scene. Located in a modern, two-story glass and wood, architect-designed building with a turf roof, the restaurant focuses on organic produce and meat prepared with a French flair (although the restaurant's name is Finnish for a type of pickle).

The Scene: In Tokyo’s Akasaka district behind an unmarked door, whose only “sign” is engraved on the door handle, is one of the world’s smallest fine restaurants—with only two tables.