Tokyo

Restaurants in Tokyo

Innovation is the trump card of restaurants in Tokyo. All kinds of sea creatures, from sea urchin and crab to eel and stingray, are apt to wind up on your plate. Noodles, from ramen to soba and more, abound.
One of the best restaurants in Tokyo is Nodaiwa. Not far from Edogawa Park, this shop serves some of the best unagi (eel) dishes—so good in fact, that the line often stretches well past the door. If you want to try your hand at Japanese cooking, visit the Tsukiji Fish Market, known as Japan's Kitchen. It's the world's largest seafood market and moves at lightning speed. If you're dedicated, you can wake early to watch the tuna auction get underway at four o'clock in the morning.
For a break from the typical Tokyo restaurant, consider Union Square Tokyo and Pierre Gagnaire à Tokyo. Union Square Tokyo puts a Western spin on traditional dishes in the Tokyo midtown area. Meanwhile, French chef Pierre Gagnaire runs his namesake restaurant on the 36th floor of the Intercontinental Hotel.

Chef Kimio Nonaga gained acclaim as the winner of the 2002 Iron Chef competition and has catered meals for the Imperial household, but his traditional kaiseki (multi-course) restaurant, located just a few minutes from Tokyo Station, is affordable and friendly.

Some of the world’s best French restaurants can be found in Tokyo, and our favorite among them is elegant Les Saisons, in the Imperial Hotel. At the helm is Chef Thierry Voisin, who was most recently at three-Michelin-starred Les Crayères in Reims.

The brilliant fortysomething chef Yoshihiro Narisawa weds French finesse and Spanish avant-garde savvy with kaiseki aesthetics and a passion for local ingredients.

Cantonese-food fans come to this uncanny simulacrum of downtown Kowloon.

Located in the penthouse of the Chanel Building in Ginza, this Michelin two-starred restaurant is a collaboration between the French fashion house and renowned chef Alain Ducasse.