Tokyo Travel Guide

Tokyo Travel Guide


Tokyo is a dizzying whirl of activity: you can practically feel it pulse, with the neon signs, the crush of people, and the perfectly punctual, high-... Read More

Tokyo is a dizzying whirl of activity: you can practically feel it pulse, with the neon signs, the crush of people, and the perfectly punctual, high-speed trains whizzing by. Then there’s a pause, a bit of green and calm on the city’s temple grounds or classical gardens. There’s a varied cultural landscape full of futuristic skyscrapers, those centuries-old temples, sophisticated hotels, and enticing restaurants. There are endless discoveries to be made there, and as you read T+L’s Tokyo travel guide, the most important question you’ll have to answer is—why wait to go?

Navigating the world’s largest metropolis—home to more than 13 million people—can be a daunting prospect for visitors. Tokyo’s maze of neighborhoods seems to offer up every imaginable sight and sound—some of them cacophonous and modern (speeding bullet trains; herds of hurrying, be-suited businessmen; bizarrely futuristic toilets), and some of them ancient (Buddhist shrines and temples; the waddling combat of sumo wrestlers). The trick here is to explore one enclave at a time; for instance, starting in Ginza or Shibuya for shopping, then heading to Shinjuku or Roppongi for nightlife. And if you get lost, just ask for help—Tokyo residents are some of the politest city-dwellers in the world.

Once a fishing village, Tokyo has evolved into an economic and cultural powerhouse. Note some of the big cultural celebrations: every two years in May, thousands flock to see the elaborate floats at the Kanda Matsuri Festival, and there’s also the Azalea Festival in April and Sunrise Festival in May. It's a city of delightful contrasts, where skyscrapers demand as much attention as Zen-style gardens. Ready to book your trip? Craft the perfect itinerary using T+L’s Tokyo travel guide.

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Best Time To Go

Locals will tell you the best time to visit Tokyo is in the fall and spring, when temperatures are temperate and the scenery is stunning. Both cherry blossom season and autumn foliage season are excellent times to visit. Many festivals take place during the month of July, when Mount Fuji is also open for climbing.


Tokyo is one of the most well-connected cities on the planet in terms of transportation, and it’s easy to get almost anywhere by train (subway tickets start at $1.40). Note you will need to walk to and from stations, so bring some good walking shoes. Taxis can be pricey but helpful in navigating the city.


August is the hottest month in Tokyo with an average temperature of 79°F (26°C) and the coldest is January at 41°F (5°C).

Know Before You Go

The rainy season starts around early June, and lasts for a few weeks. Typhoon season occurs near the end of the summer, in August and September, and can make for some strong weather patterns that can disrupt flights and trains.




Type A (two-prong plug)


Japanese Yen (¥)