The Strip

Hotels in The Strip

The newest resort in Steve Wynn's collection is less Las Vegas glam and more luxurious desert oasis. Case in point: the sunny casino has glasswalls that look out onto verdant gardens and pools.

Featuring a 30-story black glass exterior topped with the world’s brightest light beam, the Luxor is one of the most recognizable buildings on the Strip.

A block from Las Vegas Boulevard, Platinum has 255 suites, which come with full stainless-and-granite kitchens, and—unlike most properties on the Strip—these have balconies.

It takes a lot to make waves in Sin City, but Aria did it in 2009, redefining the skyline with its minimalist, curvilinear glass towers housing 4,004 rooms, 18 restaurants, eight bars, a nightclub, a casino, spa, pools, and resident Cirque du Soleil show.

With its central location on the Strip and its effortless synthesis of boutique coziness with sprawling amenities, Paris is the go-to spot for travelers in Vegas who are looking for a little elegance.

Mid-Strip extravaganza with a palatial 65,000-square-foot spa, 14 restaurants, botanical gardens, and dancing fountains.  


While this casino offers plenty for gamblers—it houses 1,723 slot machines, 39 table games, and live poker—it’s also home to the Desperado, one of the tallest and fastest roller coasters in the world, as well as a log flume ride that runs through the main casino floor.

With a history dating back to 1957, Tropicana is one of the few remaining “original” resorts on the Strip. Guests would never guess its age, however, thanks to a multimillion-dollar renovation last year.

With a casino floor flooded with natural light, a botanical theme, and a collection of restaurants with rising celebrity chefs like Paul Bartolotta and David Walzog, Wynn Las Vegas has single-handedly redefined the standard of luxury

It’s rare to find a culture-minded hotel in Las Vegas—especially smack-dab in the heart of the Strip.

Fashionably minimalist, THEhotel is meant to feel like a boutique hotel (though with 1,117 rooms, this is hardly the case).

Topped with colorful turrets rising high above the Strip, this castle-themed resort was the world’s largest hotel when it first opened in 1990.

At the 392-room property, interior designer Adam Tihany tries to re-create the experience of contemporary Hong Kong.

In a town where "classic" is a euphemism for "marked for implosion," Flamingo Las Vegas, which was originally owned by Bugsy Siegel in 1946, has exuberantly remade itself and become the hippest hotel on the Strip.

The first hotel to open in Vegas without a casino (it debuted, somewhat ironically, in a tower adjacent to Mandalay Bay in 1999), the Four Seasons is arguably still the best of this growing breed.