The Seattle and Tacoma Area

The Seattle and Tacoma Area Travel Guide

This vintage boutique and consignment shop in downtown is jam-packed with secondhand deals. The owners scour estate sales, attics, and garage sales for everything from vintage wedding dresses to hard-to-find haute couture pieces.

Every Earth Day, the Procession of the Species parade, with participants colorfully dressed as birds, turtles, killer whales and more, weaves through downtown.

Have a picnic overlooking the vines and cap it off with a few sips in the tasting room.

The museum pays tribute to native son and world-renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly, and surveys Pacific Northwest art from oils to jewelry.

Visitors can try some of Washington's best Syrahs in a starkly modern, 33,000-square-foot facility that includes a full-time kitchen staff, wine-tasting classes, and even a bocce court. The property shares its space (and winemaker) with Januik Winery.

Located along Admiralty Inlet, this 433-acre stretch of land once served as an active army installation and then a juvenile detention facility before opening to the public as a park in 1973.

For an aquatic perspective of Gig Harbor, rent a kayak, canoe, paddleboat, or powerboat. For more surefooted types, there's also the relatively newer sport of paddleboarding. Guided and non-guided excursions are available, in addition to lessons and a kayak camp for kids.

There’s no way to miss the Capitol Campus—you can see its regal, domed legislative building from almost everywhere in the city. Take a guided tour, and then stroll through the lovely conservatory and gardens.

The Provençal-style castle on 87-acres was built by Washington's second-largest wine producer.

Fifty miles from Bellingham on the Canadian border is a picture-postcard Pacific Northwest landscape of sawtooth mountains slung with hammocks of snow.

Harlequin Productions draws theatergoers to its unconventional shows here.

Drive to remote Dungeness Spit on the Olympic Peninsula, often buffeted by turbulent waters.

Bring a flashlight on the Iron Horse Trail, which parallels old railroad tracks and includes a tunnel that goes underneath the pass.

Visitors can try some of Washington's best Syrahs in a starkly modern, 33,000-square-foot facility that includes a full-time kitchen staff, wine-tasting classes, and even a bocce court. The property shares its space (and winemaker) with Novelty Hill.

This whimsical shop stocks pétanque sets and handblown sake glasses.