The Seattle and Tacoma Area

The Seattle and Tacoma Area Travel Guide

The challenging (and vertical) trail uphill leads to amazing views of Maple Valley and Mount Rainier beyond.

Just east of Capitol Lake Park, this downtown coffee shop is home to what many consider the best brew in the city.

This 150-acre preserve at the northern tip of Bainbridge Island (35 minutes by ferry from Seattle) is a mix of pristine second-growth forest and meticulously landscaped gardens.

Step through a spacious light-filled glass and aluminum entryway into Bellevue Art Museum's (BAM) textured concrete space. Designed by architect Steven Holl, this three-story, 36,000-square-foot museum has hosted exhibits by artistic icons from designer George Nelson to sculptor Michael Cooper.

Designated by Congress in 1938, mammoth and mountainous park stretches across rugged Pacific coast and lush interior old-growth forests.

Since 1951, this brick-faced Port Townsend museum in this historic district has welcomed visitors to what was once a City Hall court room.

Day-trippers head 25 miles north of Seattle to Whidbey Island, where beaches, nature, and wildlife abound. For panoramic views of the Olympic Mountains and Strait of Juan de Fuca, visit Fort Ebey State Park.

The small family winery specializes in Rhône grapes such as Syrah and juicy Grenache.

This vintage boutique and consignment shop in downtown is jam-packed with secondhand deals. The owners scour estate sales, attics, and garage sales for everything from vintage wedding dresses to hard-to-find haute couture pieces.

Every Earth Day, the Procession of the Species parade, with participants colorfully dressed as birds, turtles, killer whales and more, weaves through downtown.

Have a picnic overlooking the vines and cap it off with a few sips in the tasting room.

The museum pays tribute to native son and world-renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly, and surveys Pacific Northwest art from oils to jewelry.

Visitors can try some of Washington's best Syrahs in a starkly modern, 33,000-square-foot facility that includes a full-time kitchen staff, wine-tasting classes, and even a bocce court. The property shares its space (and winemaker) with Januik Winery.

Located along Admiralty Inlet, this 433-acre stretch of land once served as an active army installation and then a juvenile detention facility before opening to the public as a park in 1973.

For an aquatic perspective of Gig Harbor, rent a kayak, canoe, paddleboat, or powerboat. For more surefooted types, there's also the relatively newer sport of paddleboarding. Guided and non-guided excursions are available, in addition to lessons and a kayak camp for kids.