Palm Springs Area

Things to do in Palm Springs Area

Indian Canyons is ingrained in Palm Springs history. Frank Sinatra played the first invitational on the public North Course, which William P. Bell designed and debuted in 1962. Date palm and oak trees line the greens, which are set against a rocky, mountain backdrop.

The plate-glass windows beneath the blue-edged roof give a preview of the high-end 1950s furnishings for which Modernway (and Palm Springs) is known. The store’s mid-century classics span furniture, accessories, lighting, and art.

These canyons were once the home to the forerunners of the Agua Caliente Cahuilla Native Americans. Now they are open for exploration and appreciation of their natural beauty, including the Palm, Murray, Andreas, and Tahquitz Canyons.

California’s largest state park has 500 miles of hike-worthy roads and meadows awash in wildflowers, palm groves, and cacti.

Fans of antiques and American Impressionist art should include Stewart Galleries on their list of stops in Palm Springs.

Take a stroll through the free Desert Art Collection, where the eclectic patio garden features sculptures by internationally acclaimed artists.

Raw, organic "superfoods" are the basis of the bio-active face and body care products from The Body Deli. More than 175 products, such as cleansers and body soufflés, are displayed in glass cases and refrigerated bins--just like a food deli.

Mod is god at this quirky establishment.

This two-story, 18,000-square-foot contemporary art gallery in the Cahuilla Park neighborhood hosts the rotating works of artists who specialize in wood, stone, metal, glass, and other media.

This overlooked gem of a museum showcases clay as an art form, from ancient vessels to contemporary works.

The 1,200-square-mile Joshua Tree National Park, within the Colorado and Mojave Deserts, has hiking and walking trails, mountain biking paths, and thousands of climbing routes, most of them filled with freestanding granite boulders.

The school runs full-day classes that introduce you to the fundamentals of climbing in Joshua Tree National Park.

Bring a jacket—even in summer—to ride aboard the world’s largest rotating gondolas. The 2 1/2-mile, 10-minute trip up the sheer cliffs of Chino Canyon affords views of the Coachella Valley and the briny desert lake known as the Salton Sea.

The innovative Temecula Children’s Museum offers an interactive-experimental tour through the home of fictitious inventor Professor Phineas T. Pennypickle, PhD.

John McCallum, the first permanent white settle of Palm Springs, had an adobe house built for him in 1884, and along with Miss Cornelia White’s “Little House,” it makes up the museums of this nonprofit started by Melba Berry Bennett in 1955.