The Exumas

The Exumas Travel Guide

The chain of 365 cays spread over more than 100 miles in the Bahamas, known collectively as the Exumas, looks an awful lot like paradise: Sugary beaches, sapphire waters, long sunny days – and boundless potential for adventure. Any lover of the ocean should add a visit to the Exumas to their to-do list. The Exumas’ crystal-clear waters are perfect for kayaking, kiteboarding, sailing, and fishing, as well as an assortment of other fine water sports. Travelers in search of a secluded slice of paradise can bounce among small, uninhabited isles in the Exuma Cays Land & Sea Park. End the day with a plate of fresh-caught seafood and a cocktail by the beach – perhaps you’ll opt for one that’s the same shade as the ocean’s gorgeous palette of blues and greens. Whether you’re swimming, scuba diving, kayaking or kitesurfing, the Exumas are a must-visit for lovers of water sports; our Exumas travel guide will point you to some of the best sights and activities.

Things Not to Miss in the Exumas

 • Scuba diving with Dive Exuma, one of the Bahamas’ highest-rated dive operations
 • Renting a boat or kayak to cruise the cays at your leisure
 • Taking a guided tour of Moriah Cay and Elizabeth Harbour and the nearby beaches
 • Grabbing a drink at a beachside bar on the two largest islands in the chain: Great Exuma and Little Exuma
 • Enjoying a bite at the Chat & Chill Sunday pig roast in George Town, on Great Exuma

When to Go to the Exumas

With temperate weather and sunshine year-round, you can make your Exumas travel plans practically any time. Many travelers prefer to visit the Exumas in the winter, however, when temperatures are balmy and dry. June through October marks the Exumas’ rainy season, with storms, high winds and cloudy days, as well as the occasional hot, hazy and humid day.

Articles about The Exumas

In the spring of 1968, my father ran his sailboat onto a coral reef in the Bahamas. After swimming to shore from the half-sunken wreck, he wound up spending several weeks on Cat Island, in the Out Islands. My father—a marine artist—passed the time...
Until now, this remote Bahamian out island—known for its saltwater fishing, empty white beaches, and shallow bays that turn three shades of turquoise at sundown—barely registered on the chart. That's changing, but thankfully not much, with the ope...