Thailand

Things to do in Thailand

In Thailand, the calendar is crowded with festivals. The Flower Festival is a three-day celebration in Chiang Mai that begins in early February with exhibitions of flower arrangements along with performances and beauty pageants. For a less floral event, you can travel to Thailand in April to see the annual Thai-boxing competition. The exact location changes year to year, but the fights are always thrilling to see wherever they take place. Some of the country's major sights include:

The Grand Palace in Bangkok which actually consists of a number of palaces, pavilions, and temples, and is home to the famous Emerald Buddha.
Wat Pho is one of Bangkok's largest temples and has the largest statue of a reclining Buddha and the largest collection of Buddha images in all of Thailand. Wat Pho is also the site for the teaching of traditional Thai medicine and is considered to be the country's earliest public education center.
Khao Sok National Park in southern Thailand (not far from Phuket) allows travelers to explore its evergreen forests and limestone mountains by foot or atop an elephant. The park's residents also include tigers, gibbons, and a number of tropical bird species.

Located at the Mandarin Oriental Bangkok, the Oriental Spa has 19 private treatment rooms, including both several spa suites, housed inside a 19th-century teakwood home.

Browse the ingenious, inspired, and just plain nutty creations proferred at this design store at Bangkok's Emporium shopping center.

Celadon, lacquerware, and tabletop items abound at Chiang Mai's best-curated boutique.

One of Bangkok's most serene temples, a 26-foot-high Buddha sits snugly within Bangkok's tallest vihara, or assembly hall, surrounded by murals that depict his life, murals as complex and elaborate as the city outside the temple's walls.

A city standard for luxury, this 37-story tower overlooks the Chao Phraya River. The hotel's spa was revamped in 2007 to an impressive 21,000 square foot space.

Located on the Chao Phraya River, the gold-spired Grand Palace is one of Thailand’s most important sacred sites. The complex, built in 1782, served as the home of Thai kings for 150 years.

The Thailand Cultural Centre opened in 1987 to celebrate the 60th birthday of King Bhumibol Adulyadej. The center was designed and built by the Thai government with a loan of 638 million baht from the Japanese government.

Situated in the bustling district of Midtown right off the iconic Peachtree Street, UOMO Collection attracts serious businessmen out for lunch as well as hip younger men who are shopping around for new items to add to their wardrobe.

Wat Phra Kaew, more commonly known as the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, is widely regarded as Thailand’s most sacred site. The temple, located inside the Grand Palace complex, was built by King Rama I and houses a statue of Buddha carved out of a single piece of jade.

Re-create free-spirited scenes from Leo DiCaprio’s The Beach (2000) at Thailand’s Full Moon Festival.

Located on the fifth floor of the Grand Hyatt Erawan Bangkok, the expansive i.Sawan Residential Day Spa covers 75,350 square feet.

This 2006 newcomer joins the nightlife nexus on Sukhumvit Road.

Destination Spa Spa-obsessed jet-setters, take note: Six Senses has brought the best of Southeast Asia’s healing arts to a speck of land off Phuket’s eastern coast. A 26-acre retreat houses four individual spas—yes, four—each dedicated to Chinese, Indian, Indonesian, or Thai traditions.