Texas

Restaurants in Texas

For authentic Texas barbecue, make your way to Goode Company Texas Bar-B-Q. Locals know that this is the spot for mesquite-smoked meats. One of the best barbecue restaurants in Texas, it even offers delicious sides such as Austin baked beans and jalapeno cornbread. And save room for dessert, the Brazo’s Bottom pecan pie is a must try.

Though Tex-Mex may rule the state, Javier’s in High Park, Dallas proves that Mexican food has not been forgotten. This upscale Texas restaurant serves up everything from mole to Mayan style pork. The restaurant also boasts a lounge and cigar bar for those who enjoy a post dinner smoke. Those with a sweet tooth will enjoy the Tres Leches, cajeta crepes, and flan al Kahlua.

One of the most romantic restaurants in Texas is Green Pastures, a large Southern estate in the state’s capital city of Austin. Dine among the old oak trees while peacocks roam the grounds. The lavish 1888 Victorian-style home is the epitome of Southern hospitality. Diners can enjoy deliciously decadent entrees such as seared duck breast, salt and pepper poulet rouge chicken and espresso-cocoa ribeye. As for dessert, the chocolate habanero crème brūlée is the perfect blend of sweet and spicy.

This barbecue institution began as a small addition to a general store in the Texas Hill Country town of Leon Springs. Since then, it has expanded to locations throughout Texas, with a few in neighboring states, too. The look is indeed that of a Texas country store.

Once a neighborhood icehouse, the renovated building on the corner of Sawyer and Decatur Streets now houses Beaver’s restaurant and bar.

The restaurant looks and feels like a farmer's market and supports local farmers and business. It uses only biodegradable, compostable, or recycled products, including cutlery made from potatoes.

Housed in a 1925 structure built by well-known Houston architect Joseph Finger, Hugo's brings regional Mexican cuisine to the Montrose area. As a Mexican native, executive chef Hugo Ortega has an expert understanding of the country’s earthy, complex flavors.

Corny to say, but eating at Mark's can be a religious experience, and although it occupies an early 1920's brick church complete with sanctuary, side chapel, choir, and pulpit, it has little to do with the architecture or former tenant.

Located in the Arts District, Stephan Pyles derives its name from its chef, Esquire Magazine's 2006 Chef of the Year and the "father of Southwestern cuisine." The walls of the dining room feature terra-cotta bricks from the original 1963 building, as well as artwork from local Dallas artists, but

For honest, spicy enchiladas and authentic Mexican fare.

Just down the street from Minute Maid Park, this restaurant is a lunchtime favorite for downtown business folks. Knickknacks like plastic dolls and little teacups are fastened to the walls of the kitschy dining room, where customers can settle in for authentic, homemade Mexican eats.

Chefs who try to fancify lowbrow food warrant suspicion but not immediate dismissal. Max’s Wine Dive in Austin is a perfect example of why checking it out is smart. Advertised awkwardly as “upscale comfort food,” its fried chicken is better described as Tex-Mex soul.

The more casual sibling of Churrascos, which has locations in Westchase and River Oaks, Amazón Grill still brings the flavorful, creative Latin cuisine restaurateur Michael Cordúa is known for.

Originally built as a private estate in 1908, the Rosewood Mansion is now an iconic Uptown hotel housing one of the city’s most popular restaurants. The Mansion’s guests can dine inside the honey-colored dining room or outside on the candlelit terrace.

Located in The Heights, Shade showcases a cross-cultural menu from executive chef David Luna, offering everything from Asian-inspired entrées to Southern brunch classics.