Restaurants in Texas

Located in The Heights, Shade showcases a cross-cultural menu from executive chef David Luna, offering everything from Asian-inspired entrées to Southern brunch classics.

Though this North Henderson dining room has been open for years, Hibiscus’s charm continues to attract Lone Star foodies. A touch rustic in design, the main dinning area features warm wood floors, a cozy fireplace, and an open kitchen that is partially enclosed by a brick wall.

Chefs who try to fancify lowbrow food warrant suspicion but not immediate dismissal. Max’s Wine Dive in Austin is a perfect example of why checking it out is smart. Advertised awkwardly as “upscale comfort food,” its fried chicken is better described as Tex-Mex soul.

An overnight success when it opened in 2006, Dolce Vita, which occupies a rambling two-story Victorian house, feels like a private—but very welcoming—club for the young and hip Montrose denizens who swarm here every evening, spilling out onto the restaurant's jasmine-covered patio.

This venue has closed.

Aquatic-themed watering hole. The bar at this Caribbean-Mexican restaurant is backed by an enormous black-lit aquarium filled with brightly colored tropical fish.

Order the birria, a hearty Mexican goat stew. The light burgundy broth has an oily sheen, and should be showered with minced jalapeño, onion, cilantro, habanero chile, and lime juice.


Though located some 40 miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico, by 1920 Houston was a booming port, known as the city where 17 railroads meet the sea—hence the name of this restaurant, situated just off the lobby of the Alden Hotel.

The restaurant serves up hearty T-bone steaks and mesquite ribs; the property also has a small farm zoo and a playground for kids.

This retro restaurant and bar evokes Rat Pack–era Palm Springs; the
furniture in its Vegas-style space is covered with acres of tufted
leather, and its upstairs terrace has views of the Austin skyline.

Located in the Heights neighborhood, the Glass Wall offers seasonal menus of modern American cuisine created by chef Jorge Rodriguez.

Stop by for grilled pimento cheese sandwiches, cult-favorite Coca-Cola from Mexico, and a stellar burger topped with crumbly cheddar.

From an unassuming, tin-roofed structure on Manor Road, across from Interstate 35 and the University of Texas at Austin campus, El Chile serves Tex-Mex to a mixed crowd of Austin high rollers and hungry undergraduates.