Texas

Restaurants in Texas

For authentic Texas barbecue, make your way to Goode Company Texas Bar-B-Q. Locals know that this is the spot for mesquite-smoked meats. One of the best barbecue restaurants in Texas, it even offers delicious sides such as Austin baked beans and jalapeno cornbread. And save room for dessert, the Brazo’s Bottom pecan pie is a must try.

Though Tex-Mex may rule the state, Javier’s in High Park, Dallas proves that Mexican food has not been forgotten. This upscale Texas restaurant serves up everything from mole to Mayan style pork. The restaurant also boasts a lounge and cigar bar for those who enjoy a post dinner smoke. Those with a sweet tooth will enjoy the Tres Leches, cajeta crepes, and flan al Kahlua.

One of the most romantic restaurants in Texas is Green Pastures, a large Southern estate in the state’s capital city of Austin. Dine among the old oak trees while peacocks roam the grounds. The lavish 1888 Victorian-style home is the epitome of Southern hospitality. Diners can enjoy deliciously decadent entrees such as seared duck breast, salt and pepper poulet rouge chicken and espresso-cocoa ribeye. As for dessert, the chocolate habanero crème brūlée is the perfect blend of sweet and spicy.

This kitschy, colorful space has rows of painted outdoor tables and menu items—a half pound burger topped with bacon and cheddar; beer battered cod fish tacos—that might make you rethink your teeny-weeny yellow bikini.

This hole in the wall is a surfside institution. Settle in the paraphilia-filled dining room for special events like bingo night, or order your burger and crab stuffed jalapenos to go and set up a picnic on the beach just down the block.

Head to this quaint eatery for homemade lunch dishes such as the chicken salad made with apricots. Snag a patio table overlooking a lovely park.

There’s plenty of quirky finds to look out for at this Aggie institution, which originally opened in 1974 (and has original the wood-paneled walls). There’s a caged pet rattlesnake behind the bar and cheap eats like Tijuana cheese fries and Death Burgers topped with hot sauce.

Try the brisket and jalapeño-cheddar sausage at this family-owned barbecue joint, known for its oak-smoked meats and friendly service.

This charming corner shop may look freshly painted, but it originally opened in 1882, making it the oldest deli in Texas. It’s only open from 11 AM to 2:30 PM on weekdays, so swing by for lunch dishes like muffuletta sandwiches and broccoli cheese soup.

Opt for an outdoor table—an ideal spot for kiddos to look out for dolphins—at this Galveston Harbor-front restaurant. Healthy menu options include heaping Greek salads, lentil soup and, for your little picky eaters, grilled cheese pitas.

Traveling with little meat eaters? They can feast on lamb ribs and sausages at this classic barbecue restaurant, where paper plants land on checked tablecloths and the joint’s famous spice rubs are sold at the cash register.

This institution, founded in 1987, is best known for its pies—think buttermilk with chocolate chips, coconut and pecans and strawberry rhubarb with a granola topping—but also deserves a shout out for its dinner menu. The rack of lamb and grilled snapper are two standouts.

Much of Main Street was on the verge of collapse when this first-class chocolate boutique and restaurant opened several years ago.

Pop into this bakery for coffee and sweet Czech pastries—based on an old family recipe—with inventive fillings like pumpkin pecan and coconut cream.

Chef Johnny Hernandez, a local celebrity, opened Fruteria - Botanero in South Town, a neighborhood where beautiful old industrial buildings are reopening as condos, shops and restaurants.

Pick up a sweet treat at this new bakery, owned by Anne Ng and Jeremy Mandrell who cut their teeth at Bouchon Bakery in Yountville, California, before relocating to the south. Locals are already addicted to their refined tarts and fluffy macaroons.

There’s no better place to go for burgers and shakes, especially since this casual joint with great outdoor seating and a big playground is connected to the Austin-born Amy’s Ice Cream (try the Mexican Vanilla).

You’ll pass open fires on your way to the casual dining room at this barbecue joint; eaters get a stack of white bread and one plastic knife with each order of hot rings (sausages) and fat brisket.