Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv Travel Guide

Alternately plays host to classical quartets and hip-hop parties.

Housed in a former train station, Made in TLV stocks a sleek range of design books, tabletop pieces, candles, and photographs.

Run by siblings Nimrod Zaltsman and hilla Wenkert, six-month-old olive oil boutique, Olia, stocks regionally sourced products such as olive tapenade infused with Parmesan cheese.

Wedged into a tight, triangular site within the city’s central cultural complex, this piece of architectural origami uses a soaring, twisting, 87-foot-tall atrium, called Lightfall, to link a series of refreshingly uncomplicated galleries.

The Russian nerve center of Allenby Street is full of curious pensioners and boulevard intellectuals feasting on a lifetime’s worth of Isaac Asimov’s science fiction, Russian translations of the kabbalah, and an illustrated Hebrew-Russian version of Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, which is pres

The Bauhaus Foundation Museum, housing original furniture and other designs by the likes of miens van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer, opened in April on Bialik Street.

Tel Aviv's lively old quarter.

In the emerging Noga district, this boutique sells funky housewares, including signature "lamp dresses"-lights covered in Mondrian-inspired frock-shaped mylar paper shells.

A neo-Georgian supper club, a place where one can order a cool
pomegranate vodka drink, featuring grenadine juice from Russia and
crushed ice, or a frozen margarita made with native arak liquor,
almonds, and rose juice. The décor is mellow and cozy like a shabby

The club hosts a popular Sunday night showcase for Russian bands called “Stakanchik,” or “little drinking glass.” Amid luxuriant George of the Jungle décor, young, hip, and sometimes pregnant people in ironic CCCP and Jesus T-shirts shimmy and sway by the stage.