Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv Travel Guide

A neo-Georgian supper club, a place where one can order a cool
pomegranate vodka drink, featuring grenadine juice from Russia and
crushed ice, or a frozen margarita made with native arak liquor,
almonds, and rose juice. The décor is mellow and cozy like a shabby

The club hosts a popular Sunday night showcase for Russian bands called “Stakanchik,” or “little drinking glass.” Amid luxuriant George of the Jungle décor, young, hip, and sometimes pregnant people in ironic CCCP and Jesus T-shirts shimmy and sway by the stage.

Great stop for a strong cup of coffee.

Israeli restaurants and wineries set up booths in Hayarkan Park to showcase delicacies in the annual Taste of Tel Aviv festival.

Vintage hunters will swoon over this spacious boutique filled with restored furniture by Midcentury masters, including Eames, Nelson, and Aalto. Don’t miss the 1950’s-era Israeli items—from Hebrew-language globes to kibbutz-style chairs.

Where a medieval-looking portal leads to an invitingly gloomy space.

At Israeli artist Ayala Serfaty's 2010-opened shop, you'll find a selection of ottomans and chairs covered in velvet or Lycra and in organic shapes—bubbles; poufs.

The latest addition to the Tel Aviv art scene.

Where the celebrated Inbal and Batsheva dance companies are based.