Tel Aviv

Things to do in Tel Aviv

As one of Israel’s most lively cities, there really is no shortage of things to do in Tel Aviv and for this reason, the city has earned a reputation as being open 24 hours a day (except for the Sabbath, of course).
Start your trip off with a day spent in the charming city of Jaffa, which is the “old city” section of Tel Aviv and served as a major port of the ancient world. Admire centuries-old stonework, dip into a hookah bar for an afternoon smoke and wander along the cobblestone streets that run along the Jaffa port.

Back in Tel Aviv proper, be sure to visit the ever-bustling Carmel Market where tourists can get everything from cheesy souvenirs to rare spices and authentic foodstuffs. From there, head to the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, founded in 1932 by the city’s first mayor, and see the work of local and international artists or go on a free morning tour of the city’s extensive Bauhaus architecture, which is admired worldwide.

And before you go, leave your mark on the city in the Florentine neighborhood, often described as Israel’s version of Williamsburg or Portland. Browse art galleries, throw back an Israeli beer and feel free to purchase a few cans of spray-paint and leave your own tag: Graffiti is legal in the neighborhood. And finally, be sure to rent a bike through the Tel Aviv’s Tel-o-Fun bike share if you’re wondering what to do in Tel Aviv. The breezy ride along the boardwalk is one you won’t soon forget.

The club hosts a popular Sunday night showcase for Russian bands called “Stakanchik,” or “little drinking glass.” Amid luxuriant George of the Jungle décor, young, hip, and sometimes pregnant people in ironic CCCP and Jesus T-shirts shimmy and sway by the stage.

Where a medieval-looking portal leads to an invitingly gloomy space.

At Israeli artist Ayala Serfaty's 2010-opened shop, you'll find a selection of ottomans and chairs covered in velvet or Lycra and in organic shapes—bubbles; poufs.

A chic retail and gallery space.

Housed in a former train station, Made in TLV stocks a sleek range of design books, tabletop pieces, candles, and photographs.

The Bauhaus Foundation Museum, housing original furniture and other designs by the likes of miens van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer, opened in April on Bialik Street.

In the emerging Noga district, this boutique sells funky housewares, including signature "lamp dresses"-lights covered in Mondrian-inspired frock-shaped mylar paper shells.

Great stop for a strong cup of coffee.

Vintage hunters will swoon over this spacious boutique filled with restored furniture by Midcentury masters, including Eames, Nelson, and Aalto. Don’t miss the 1950’s-era Israeli items—from Hebrew-language globes to kibbutz-style chairs.

The latest addition to the Tel Aviv art scene.

Talents Design showcases works by such up-and-coming Israeli designers as Dor Carmon. Best finds: orchid-shaped couches and earthy stone tables.