Taiwan

Taiwan Travel Guide

While Taiwan owes a lot of its global success to its economic policies, this tiny democratic island has a lot more to offer the curious traveler than the "made in" stamps would have you think. With jaw-dropping scenery, a burgeoning art scene and some of the best street food in Asia, Taiwan travel is one of Asia's best-kept secrets. Travel to Taiwan to experience the country's majestic Buddhist temples, world-class shopping and awe-inspiring national parks.

Consult Travel + Leisure's Taiwan Travel Guide for the inside track around the island.

Things Not to Miss in Taiwan

• Teahouses – You can't leave Taiwan without visiting one of the country's beautiful teahouses. The now popular Bubble Tea and Pearl Milk Tea were first made at the teahouses in Taichung.

 • National Parks – From the scenic peaks of Yushan to the beautiful beaches of Kenting, visiting one of Taiwan's eight national parks is a must.

 • Temples– the old capital of Tainan is home to some of the Taiwan's most beautiful and historical temples.

 • Night Markets – visit the night markets in any of Taiwan's cities for a sensory overload of bright colors, distinct aromas and to taste some of the "little eats" on offer.

 • Festivals – The Dragon Boat Festival and Lantern Festival are just two of Taiwan's spectacular annual events. Catching a celebration by one of the island's aboriginal tribes is something to look forward to during a visit.

When to Go to Taiwan

Taiwan has a subtropical climate with wet, humid summers and short mild winters. With temperatures in the low '60s to early '70s, the autumn and winter are considered the most comfortable time of year to visit Taiwan. In general, the northern half of the island is cooler and wetter than the south, but the southeast monsoon season which begins in May and ends in late September can bring with it two or three typhoons a year. Most of the island shuts down for the week of Chinese New Year so check your calendar before booking a trip in late January or early February.

Articles about Taiwan

As Taiwan surveys the damage wreaked by supertyphoonSouledor over the weekend, including at least seven confirmed dead and 100 missing, locals are finding some lighthearted relief in what is otherwise a dark situation — namely, in two mailboxes in...
I was in the Yingge District in New Taipei City, Taiwan, about half an hour by train from central Taipei, where I was hoping to find a thousand-year-old Chinese bowl. The area has a quietly beautiful cobblestoned main street, lined with unexpected...
I was in the Yingge District in New Taipei City, Taiwan, about half an hour by train from central Taipei, where I was hoping to find a thousand-year-old Chinese bowl. The area has a quietly beautiful cobblestoned main street, lined with unexpected...
Lay of the Land Daan: Wide, tree-lined boulevards, the city’s largest park, and an endless array of restaurants and boutiques make the Daan district Taipei’s most coveted address. Datong: Once a mighty economic center, Datong is now home to ...
WHY NOW Considering that Taiwan is barely 4 percent Christian, you may be surprised to see reminders of Christmas everywhere (of course, those lights on your tree back home were probably made here). Some bus drivers dress as Santa; the streets ech...
It's that time of year—when flickering lights illuminate the sky, snow blankets the ground, and airports overflow with travelers. While destinations that promise a white Christmas are the obvious choice (and for good reason), holiday cheer can als...
Wandering through the riotous, labyrinthine stalls of Bangkok’s Chatuchak Market has given you an appetite. For hours, you’ve been pressing between crowds of local women haggling over mangoes, melons, and rank-smelling durian fruit; karaoke-CD haw...
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Cross-cultural pollination means that both the croissant and the bagel have traveled far from home, and the “continental breakfast” still reigns supreme at hotels all over the world. But only in Japan will the morning meal offer dashi-maki tamago ...
HONG KONG Causeway Bay A creative hub of café and consumer culture THE SCENE Neon-lit and dense with high-rises, Causeway Bay fuses the essences of New York, Hong Kong, and Tokyo into one bubbling urban stew, with teenage punks, media typ...